ghost writer

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ghost writer

A writer (usually a professional) who assists in the writing of something (such as a book or speech) without taking credit for it. A: "I'm so impressed with the celebrity memoir I'm reading. I didn't expect this singer to be able to write so well!" B: "Yeah, she probably had a ghost writer!" Being the ghostwriter of some of the president's speeches is the greatest achievement of my life.
See also: ghost, writer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The ghostwriter said that most of his clients are from GCC countries and are taught in Arabic in public schools.
No work by ivkovic is without substance, and The Ghostwriter ponders the rights of authorship and the indeterminacy of identity in the Internet age.
This had all started to change by the election of Warren Harding, the first president to employ a full-time ghostwriter. Judson Welliver wrote Harding's speeches, which H.
The ghostwriter, played with an engaging charm by Ewan McGregor, is only ever referred to as the Ghost.
But the nameless narrator, an experienced, talented ghostwriter, has accepted an opportunity to polish, in five weeks, the draft of the memoirs of the recent Prime Minister of England, Adam Lang, who is remarkably like Tony Blair.
If not, then think of topics on your own, compose on your own, or hire a ghostwriter (I'm not available!).
Both the ghostwriter and the physician are at fault: The doctor gets credit (and money) for work he or she didn't do, and the pharmaceutical company can promote the drug under a mantle of scientific respectability.
Former ghostwriter and creator of the "Wednesday Words" email devotional Leigh McLeroy presents The Beautiful Ache: Finding the God Who Satisfies When Life Does Not, a collection of inspirational writings reaching out to fellow Christians who feel unsatisfied despite the adventures of life, marriage, and career.
"The Ghostwriter." Looking at the contents I was pleased to see many articles that excited me.
Eric Watson is something of a jack of all trades, having worked as a counselor, stockbroker, ghostwriter, graphic designer, and dot-com entrepreneur over the last 30 years.
In the foreword to his recounting of his tenure at IBM, Who Says Elephants Can't Dance?, he declares: "I wrote this book without the aid of a coauthor or a ghostwriter (which is why it's a good bet this is going to be my last book; I had no idea it would be so hard to do)."
With an intellectually observant voice, no doubt aided by the book's ghostwriter, music journalist Kris Ex, 50 makes his memoir socially relevant, weaving it around a supporting cast whose lives, like his, are being swallowed by urban decay and drugs.
His name was Osama Bin Laden and he had a different narrative." The book is peppered with spew-inducing passages like, "When the Berlin Wall becomes the Berlin Mall ..." I suspect Nipsey Russell was the ghostwriter.
Often this is because the people purporting to be telling their life story have actually paid a ghostwriter to do the job.
The 007 star took the dramatic step after failing to agree terms with a ghostwriter.