get around to (something)

(redirected from getting around to)

get around to (something)

To eventually do something when one is able to. Oh man, I haven't gotten around to printing that document yet—just give me a sec, I'll do it right now. I've got so much to do today that I don't know when I'll get around to these expense reports.
See also: around, get, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

get around to doing something

to find time to do something; to do something after a long delay. (See also get (around) to someone or something.) I finally got around to buying a new coat. It took Sally years to get around to visiting her aunt.
See also: around, get, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Demonstrating the social, health and environmental benefits of cycling, the week aims to get people to give cycling a go all over the UK, whether this be for fun, as a means of getting around to work or school, the local shops or just to visit friends.
Isn't it great to see our local politicians getting around to tackling the issues that really matter?
From tips for getting around to health and safety advice to extensive directions, maps, black-and-white photographs, recommended hotels, hours for ideal eateries and gift shops, sports and recreation facilities, and much more, Big Island of Hawai'i is a compact, information-laden guide that no traveler to Hawai'i's Big Island should be without.
That doesn't explain though why the council is only now getting around to granting itself permission to run something that it knew many weeks ago would be in place over the Christmas period.
Mexico is finally getting around to paying back the money owed to thousands of its people who took part in the Bracero Program, a temporary worker agreement the country had with the United States between 1942 and 1967.
We think this time-limited "keeper" that connects with a community over time could swing the balance in getting people to respond to an alert, instead of not getting around to it.
"It's a matter of getting around to it," says Kameny, who's lived in Washington, D.C., for the past 40 years and still makes rabble-rousing speeches for groups such as the Servicemembers Legal Defense Fund.
I mean, unless managers are setting capacity aside for redundancy or automatic backups, and just never getting around to recording those sectors.
It's just that the world at large is finally getting around to acknowledging and appreciating the pervasive talent in our culture.