get along

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get along

1. To interact (with someone) in a mutually friendly or amiable way. I'm glad you finally got to meet my brother—I knew you two would get along. My grandparents have been married for over 50 years and they still get along!
2. To depart. Oh, I need to get along now, or else I'll miss the train!
3. To progress, as in age. Unfortunately, my arthritis bothers me more as I get along in years.
4. To endure or persevere. Now that I've been laid off, I don't know how my family will get along.
See also: get

get along (on a shoestring)

 and get by (on a shoestring)
Fig. to be able to afford to live on very little money. For the last two years, we have had to get along on a shoestring. With so many expenses, it's hard to get by on a shoestring.
See also: get

get along

 
1. [for people or animals] to be amiable with one another. Those two just don't get along. They seem to get along just fine.
2. to leave; to be on one's way. I've got to get along. It's getting late. It's time for me to get along. See you later.
See also: get

get along

1. Also, get on. Be or continue to be on harmonious terms. For example, She finds it hard to get along with her in-laws, or He gets on well with all of his neighbors except one. The use of along dates from the late 1800s; the use of on dates from the early 1800s. A colloquial synonym for get along well is get on like a house afire, in effect comparing increasingly good relations to the rapid progress of a fire.
2. Also, get on. Manage, fare with some success; also, prosper. For example, I can just get along in this town on those wages, or Her way of getting on in the world was to marry a rich man. The use of on dates from the late 1700s; the variant dates from the early 1800s.
3. get along without. Manage without something, as in With that new car loan, he can't get along without a raise. [Early 1800s]
4. Also, get on. Progress; advance, especially in years. For example, How are you getting along with the refinishing? or Dad doesn't hear too well; he's getting on, you know. [Late 1700s] Also see along in years; get on, def. 5.
5. get along with you. Go away; also, be quiet, drop the subject, as in "Leave me. Get along with you" (Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge, 1837). [First half of 1800s] Also see get on.
See also: get

get along

v.
1. To be or continue to be on harmonious terms with someone: I never got along with the mail carrier. Do you think the cats and dogs will get along if we put them in a cage together?
2. To manage or fare, especially with reasonable success: There's no way I can get along on those wages. How are you getting along these days?
3. To advance or make progress, especially in age: He's not as athletic as he was before, but he is getting along in age.
4. To go away; leave: She told the children to get along and leave her to her work.
See also: get
References in periodicals archive ?
From mastering the local hurdles from abroad to getting along with the cultural and social particularities of the country; from recognizing an opportunity to evaluating potential return, this report takes readers across the venture capital landscape in Switzerland, covering the important, while highlighting the essentials.
They're all getting along really well together,'' Cwayna said.
A gripping narrative of survival, and especially, the difficulties of getting along together in extremely cramped quarters and desperate conditions.
YOU'RE OLDER, SHE'S YOUNGER Alexa Falk, 14, is a pro at getting along with her sister Natalee, 12.
and this book tells briefly about how various Muslim teenagers feel about their faith, getting along with non-Muslims, school situations, and so forth.
In the interest of getting along, we agreed to the NBA's request.
Even though Trebilcock cannot play on the team until December due to NCAA transfer rules, she is having no problem getting along with her new teammates.
The collaboration by psychologists Nigel Hunt and Sue McHale, Coping With Alopecia offers solid information and practical advice about the different types of alopecia, causes and treatments, and how to cope with the social consequences of hair loss, from getting along with peers to the strain that losing one's hair can put on relationships.
Getting along with their parents (82%) -- Feeling good about themselves / feeling happy (80%) -- Getting along with their siblings (73%) -- Making friends (67%) -- Participating in after school activities (65%)
Ordinary folk" can feel threatened by people who don't respond to what they're good at--fitting in and getting along.
According to my review of psychological and criminal research, children with early delinquent and aggressive delayed emotional and intellectual functioning, a history of being continually disruptive, difficulty in getting along with other children, and those who come from homes with disruptive parenting are most prone to act out their rage through murder," said Butterworth.
We realized that our not getting along affected the whole team.
3AM LOVE to see old friends getting along, so imagine our delight at these snaps of Jamie Theakston with his on-off love Joely Richardson.
These books will teach children about getting along with others who are different due to heritage, handicaps and natural abilities.