get along

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get along

1. To interact (with someone) in a mutually friendly or amiable way. I'm glad you finally got to meet my brother—I knew you two would get along. My grandparents have been married for over 50 years and they still get along!
2. To depart. Oh, I need to get along now, or else I'll miss the train!
3. To progress, as in age. Unfortunately, my arthritis bothers me more as I get along in years.
4. To endure or persevere. Now that I've been laid off, I don't know how my family will get along.
See also: get

get along (on a shoestring)

 and get by (on a shoestring)
Fig. to be able to afford to live on very little money. For the last two years, we have had to get along on a shoestring. With so many expenses, it's hard to get by on a shoestring.
See also: get

get along

 
1. [for people or animals] to be amiable with one another. Those two just don't get along. They seem to get along just fine.
2. to leave; to be on one's way. I've got to get along. It's getting late. It's time for me to get along. See you later.
See also: get

get along

1. Also, get on. Be or continue to be on harmonious terms. For example, She finds it hard to get along with her in-laws, or He gets on well with all of his neighbors except one. The use of along dates from the late 1800s; the use of on dates from the early 1800s. A colloquial synonym for get along well is get on like a house afire, in effect comparing increasingly good relations to the rapid progress of a fire.
2. Also, get on. Manage, fare with some success; also, prosper. For example, I can just get along in this town on those wages, or Her way of getting on in the world was to marry a rich man. The use of on dates from the late 1700s; the variant dates from the early 1800s.
3. get along without. Manage without something, as in With that new car loan, he can't get along without a raise. [Early 1800s]
4. Also, get on. Progress; advance, especially in years. For example, How are you getting along with the refinishing? or Dad doesn't hear too well; he's getting on, you know. [Late 1700s] Also see along in years; get on, def. 5.
5. get along with you. Go away; also, be quiet, drop the subject, as in "Leave me. Get along with you" (Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge, 1837). [First half of 1800s] Also see get on.
See also: get

get along

v.
1. To be or continue to be on harmonious terms with someone: I never got along with the mail carrier. Do you think the cats and dogs will get along if we put them in a cage together?
2. To manage or fare, especially with reasonable success: There's no way I can get along on those wages. How are you getting along these days?
3. To advance or make progress, especially in age: He's not as athletic as he was before, but he is getting along in age.
4. To go away; leave: She told the children to get along and leave her to her work.
See also: get
References in periodicals archive ?
Blitman also presented "The Mediation Advantage: Getting Ahead by Getting Along in Business," for Florida Atlantic University's Small Business Development Center in Pembroke Pines.
Written by internationally known speaker and author Florence Littauer, How To Get Along With Difficult People is a straightforward catalogue of difficult personality types one is likely to encounter at church, at college, at the office, or in any other walk of life, and advice for getting along with each of them.
Getting along with your born-again neighbor"), the distinguished Barna Research Group defines "born-again Christians" as "people who said they have made a personal commitment to Jesus Christ that is still important in their life today and who also indicated that they believe that when they die they will go to heaven because they had confessed their sins and had accepted Jesus Christ as their savior."
It's no wonder that people around the world are having some difficulties getting along and adjusting, yet Humanists believe cooperation and prosperity are attainable if we work to find common ground through reason.
Sections that deal with areas such as deciding whether to accept an assignment when it is not what you initially wanted, keeping in contact with your detailer, duty in Washington, getting along with seniors, and dealing with your contemporaries are filled with nuggets that go a long way in helping you deal with your service experience.
The failings of these sweatsuited figures are animated by their opposite in a large, five-panel drawing of men doing nothing more startling than getting along with each other.
"You'll be pleased to hear that London is back at work today and in true British 'stiff upper lip' fashion, we're all getting along with our lives.
But zoo officials say that Maggie has a history of not getting along with other elephants.
Despite the great fashion divide, everyone seems to be getting along.
A pioneering work, Yager offers the reader "Ten Principles to Getting Along With Your Workplace Relationships"; "Seven Things To Never Share With A Workplace Relationship", and sections devoted to international and gender differences.
Most important of all was getting along with fellow campers and developing an appreciation for service to others.
Almost like a koala, Jones had made a bunya pine his home for several weeks, building a small shelter to protect himself from the elements, getting along well with neighboring opossums, and providing inspiration for those on the ground.
Since 1997, Slessor was getting along fine as the head of a single district--Waverly-Shell Rock--that has 2,000 students in seven schools.
Even more to the point, getting along in a pluralistic society requires that while all faiths are respected, none are enshrined--officially or otherwise--in our government or its policies.
As well, there's a long history of ballet and opera companies not getting along well together in shared spaces because we function differently, but I hope we can make this work."