get

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Related to getting: Getting Things Done

get (one's)

1. To receive the due punishment (for something) that one deserves. Don't worry about those stool pigeons, we'll make sure they get theirs when the time is right. She cheated off me during the test? Oh, she'll get hers, alright!
2. To become wealthy or financially successful. After growing up in poverty, Jim was determined to get his no matter what it took.
See also: get

get something (for an amount of money)

to buy something for a certain amount of money. I got my car for only $1500. She got her dinner for a song.

get something

 and get it 
1. to receive punishment. Bill broke the window, and he's really going to get it. John got it for arriving late at school.
2. to receive the meaning of a joke; to understand a joke. John told a joke, but I didn't get it. Bob laughed very hard, but Mary didn't get it.

get

 on
1. to get along; to thrive. Well, how are you two getting on? We are getting on okay.
2. Go to get on something and get on (with someone).

get

/have (someone's) number
To determine or know someone's real character or motives.

get

/have the best of
To outdo or outwit; defeat: My opponent got the best of me in the debate.

get

/have the better of
To outdo or outwit; defeat.

get

/have the drop on
To achieve a distinct advantage over.

get

/have the worst of it
To suffer a defeat or disadvantage.

get

/lay (one's) hands on
To get possession of; acquire or obtain.

get

/put it all together Slang
To unify and harmonize one's resources so as to perform with maximal effectiveness.

get

/sink (one's) teeth into Slang
To be actively involved in; get a firm grasp of.
See:
References in classic literature ?
It is only three weeks more and then we will take a nice little trip of a few days while Jennie is getting the house ready.
I am getting angry enough to do something desperate.
Herself, the stenographer, he, the notorious and powerful gambling millionaire, and the gate between them across which poured his argument of people getting acquainted and married.
It's getting late now, anyway," Daylight hurried on, "and we've settled nothing after all.
I shall go home with her, for it is getting darkish, and she is rather timid," said Archie, forgetting that he had often laughed at this very timidity.
Yes, of course," said Marilla, as if getting boys from orphan asylums in Nova Scotia were part of the usual spring work on any well-regulated Avonlea farm instead of being an unheard of innovation.
Matthew is getting up in years, you know--he's sixty-- and he isn't so spry as he once was.
He's getting round all right--but stewing in a broth of trouble, as usual, poor man.
However, he was obliged to try some other mode of getting popular, and this one occurred to him.
Let's pretend there's a way of getting through into it, somehow, Kitty.
You can get ten to join a game, or climb a tree, or swim a stream, when there's a chance of breaking their limbs or getting drowned, for one who'll stay on level ground, or in his depth, or play quoits or bowls.
Getting up from the seat and handing her maid a bag, she gave her little wrinkled hand to her son to kiss, and lifting his head from her hand, kissed him on the cheek.
My lady had discovered that I was getting old before I had discovered it myself, and she had come to my cottage to wheedle me (if I may use such an expression) into giving up my hard out-of-door work as bailiff, and taking my ease for the rest of my days as steward in the house.
The right person to claim the property (if the truth had been known) was a distant relation, who had no idea of ever getting it, and who was away at sea when his father died.
Already she's getting as pale as wax, and as heavy as - I am.