get the idea

(redirected from gets the idea)

get the idea

To understand or comprehend something. Mom, quit lecturing me—I get the idea! I won't come in after curfew any more.
See also: get, idea

get the iˈdea

(informal) understand something when it has been explained to you: ‘Do you understand how it works now?’ ‘Yes, I think I’ve got the idea. Thanks for showing me.’
See also: get, idea
References in periodicals archive ?
To record Shepherd's side effects Bergmann uses words like "ptcummmmmmm" or "kchoooooooooo," but one generally gets the idea.
When half of the population gets the idea that they do not have to work because the other half of the population is going to take care of them, then when half of the population gets the idea that it does no good to work because somebody else is going to get what they work for, that is the beginning of the end of any nation.
Now before anyone gets the idea that this is another riposte from the other side, not a bit of it.
vvFrankel ata nyd istance I can't see where Lee from Hull (Chatroom, Friday) gets the idea that Frankel wouldn't stay the Arc trip.
Also, goodness knows where the writer gets the idea that the team is full of foreigners, as it is not.
It helps them to upgrade the collections, knowledge top of it industry gets the idea what the students are capable of doing.
She gets the idea to hold a sponsored run as well as an interesting offer from Garry and Hywel.
If the public gets the idea that compost is no good, they'll stop making efforts to put out their yard waste.
Quite where he gets the idea that most Jewish Israelis are from "Turkmenistan" I have no idea, but it makes as much sense as the rest of his fantasy.
Malcolm Jenkins, station manager at Weston-super-Mare fire station, said: "We recommend no one gets the idea they can go along and pick up money.
It's when Henry sees the assembly line arrangement of Santa's elves in the manufacturing of toys that he gets the idea to apply what he's seen and creates the world's first automobile assembly line.
You don't have to be the world's greatest writer, but learn to put words on paper in a way that is readable, grammatical, and gets the idea or point across.
Then Skiff gets the idea to take a harpoon his father once made, go out on the little skiff, and catch a blue fin tuna--selling it to a Japanese man who flies the tuna overnight to Japan to use as sushi.
Pal Nick (Sanz) gets the idea to take a singles cruise when he encounters an even less-attractive school acquaintance with a beautiful bimbo he met on one.
While Buchloh can be too sparing with explanatory unpacking, one soon gets the idea and finds welcome relief in his workmanlike practice (and unexpected eloquence) from the slippery, unexamined jargon that serves in the hands of others as substitute for argument.