get along

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get along

1. To interact (with someone) in a mutually friendly or amiable way. I'm glad you finally got to meet my brother—I knew you two would get along. My grandparents have been married for over 50 years and they still get along!
2. To depart. Oh, I need to get along now, or else I'll miss the train!
3. To progress, as in age. Unfortunately, my arthritis bothers me more as I get along in years.
4. To endure or persevere. Now that I've been laid off, I don't know how my family will get along.
See also: get

get along (on a shoestring)

 and get by (on a shoestring)
Fig. to be able to afford to live on very little money. For the last two years, we have had to get along on a shoestring. With so many expenses, it's hard to get by on a shoestring.
See also: get

get along

 
1. [for people or animals] to be amiable with one another. Those two just don't get along. They seem to get along just fine.
2. to leave; to be on one's way. I've got to get along. It's getting late. It's time for me to get along. See you later.
See also: get

get along

1. Also, get on. Be or continue to be on harmonious terms. For example, She finds it hard to get along with her in-laws, or He gets on well with all of his neighbors except one. The use of along dates from the late 1800s; the use of on dates from the early 1800s. A colloquial synonym for get along well is get on like a house afire, in effect comparing increasingly good relations to the rapid progress of a fire.
2. Also, get on. Manage, fare with some success; also, prosper. For example, I can just get along in this town on those wages, or Her way of getting on in the world was to marry a rich man. The use of on dates from the late 1700s; the variant dates from the early 1800s.
3. get along without. Manage without something, as in With that new car loan, he can't get along without a raise. [Early 1800s]
4. Also, get on. Progress; advance, especially in years. For example, How are you getting along with the refinishing? or Dad doesn't hear too well; he's getting on, you know. [Late 1700s] Also see along in years; get on, def. 5.
5. get along with you. Go away; also, be quiet, drop the subject, as in "Leave me. Get along with you" (Charles Dickens, Barnaby Rudge, 1837). [First half of 1800s] Also see get on.
See also: get

get along

v.
1. To be or continue to be on harmonious terms with someone: I never got along with the mail carrier. Do you think the cats and dogs will get along if we put them in a cage together?
2. To manage or fare, especially with reasonable success: There's no way I can get along on those wages. How are you getting along these days?
3. To advance or make progress, especially in age: He's not as athletic as he was before, but he is getting along in age.
4. To go away; leave: She told the children to get along and leave her to her work.
See also: get
References in periodicals archive ?
Joe gets along well with the boss, but everyone else in the office is afraid of him.
Spencer is a large but sociable dog who gets along with other dogs and cats, kennel workers say.
Our family really gets along disgustingly well,'' said Tom Berg, who heads the Ventura County Resource Management Agency.
She gets along well with other dogs, cats and chickens, shelter workers say.
One has to respect a man like that, especially at a time in sports when smack is king, nobody gets along, and 90 percent of athletes have I problems.
The mall also features another closed-off area where prospective adoptive families can interact with the animals to see how everyone gets along, Knapp said.
Despite their tendency for solitude, Tran said, the group gets along fine.
We are looking for someone who is cheerful, gets along well with children, is interested in community service and has some extra time,'' said Zonta member Pat Willett.
There was never bad blood between Jane and Bryant and me,'' says Norville, who'll have us know she gets along fine with Bryant.