get out


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get out

1. To remove or extract something from some one, place or thing. Can you get this book out? It's really wedged into place here on the shelf. Were the doctors able to get that shard of glass out of his foot?
2. To depart, flee or escape. We need to get out of here before the police show up!
3. To cause someone or something to depart, flee, or escape. Get the kids out of here—this situation is too dangerous!
4. To speak, sing, or otherwise verbalize something, often when doing so is difficult. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "out." I was supposed to sing in the talent show, but once I saw how many people were in the audience, I couldn't get a note out. Please, let me get the words out before I lose my nerve!
5. To be revealed. How did word get out? We tried so hard to make sure she didn't know about the surprise party.
6. To reveal something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "out." If the government doesn't get these facts out there now, more people will die.
7. To produce, create, or publish something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "get" and "out." How soon can we get out the next issue of the magazine?
See also: get, out

get it out

Fig. to tell someone about a problem; to pour out one's grief. (Fixed order.) Come on, get it out. You'll feel better. He would feel better if he could get it out.
See also: get, out

get something out (of someone or something)

to remove something from someone or something. He probably will be okay when they get the tumor out of him. Please get that dog out of the living room.
See also: get, out

get something out

 
1. Lit. to remove or extricate something. Please help me get this splinter out. Would you help me get out this splinter? The tooth was gotten out without much difficulty.
2. Fig. to manage to get something said. He tried to say it before he died, but he couldn't get it out. I had my mouth full and couldn't get out the words.
See also: get, out

get out

1. Leave, escape, as in With good conduct he'll get out of prison in a few months, or In case of a fire, we just want to get out alive. [c. 1300] This phrase is also used as an imperative, ordering someone to depart. For example, Get out! You've no business being in here. [c. 1700] Also see get out of, def. 1.
2. Become known, as in Somehow the secret got out. [Late 1800s] Also see out in the open.
3. get something out. Publish something, as in Once we get out the newsletter, we can concentrate on other projects. [Late 1700s]
4. Produce a sound, as in The singer had a sore throat and could hardly get out a note. [First half of 1800s] Also see the subsequent idioms beginning with get out.
See also: get, out

get out

v.
1. To leave or escape: I got out of the car and followed them. I'm stuck in this terrible job and I can't get out. Someone left the door open and the cat got out.
2. To cause to leave or escape: I got them out of the car just in time.
3. To bring something into the open; expose something in order to use it: The students got their notebooks out and began writing. The reporters got out their equipment and started recording.
4. To express some feeling, emotion, or condition: If something is bothering you, you should get it out so we can discuss it.
5. To become known: Somehow our secret got out.
6. To cause something to become known; disseminate something: We need to get this important information out. Let's get out the news as quickly as possible.
7. To produce or manufacture something: The factory got out 5,000 parts just in time. The publisher got 25 new titles out last year.
See also: get, out

get it out

tv. to tell (someone) about a problem; to pour out one’s grief. He would feel better if he could get it out.
See also: get, out