get away


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get away

 (from someone or something)
1. to escape from someone, something, or some place. Max did get away from the prison guard but was caught soon after. Mary couldn't get away from the telephone all morning.
2. . Go to away (from someone or something).
See also: away, get

get away

to move away. (Often a command.) Get away! Don't bother me! I tried to get away, but he wouldn't let me.
See also: away, get

get away

1. Break free, escape, as in The suspect ran down the street and got away, or I wanted to come but couldn't get away from the office. [c. 1300] A variant is get away from it all, meaning "to depart and leave one's surroundings or problems or work behind." For example, Joe is taking a few days off-he needs to get away from it all.
2. Start out or leave quickly, as in The greyhounds got away from the starting gate, or I thought I had the answer but it got away from me.
3. Go, move off. For example, Get away from my desk! or Get away-I don't want you near that hot stove. [Late 1700s] Also see get away with.
See also: away, get

get away

v.
1. To leave or go away, especially to make an excursion: I'd really like to get away to a nice warm beach this year. We need a vacation; let's get away.
2. To cause something or someone to leave or go away: Get those ugly lizards away from here!
3. To leave a particular location where one has a responsibility or duty to be: Work has been busy, so I'll go to lunch with you if I can get away.
4. To escape or avoid capture: The thieves were able to get away in their car before anyone knew they had left.
5. To succeed in some wrongdoing without being accused or without being punished: The merchants always got away with overcharging the customers.
6. To succeed at something that would typically be expected to fail: We got away with driving the old car all the way across the country without once checking our oil.
See also: away, get