get an eyeful

get an eyeful

To see a surprising or unexpected sight. I sure got an eyeful when I walked in on Al while he was trying on his artichoke costume.
See also: eyeful, get

have/get an ˈeyeful (of something)

(British English, spoken) look carefully at something that is interesting or unusual: Quick! Come and get an eyeful of this!
See also: eyeful, get, have
References in periodicals archive ?
But they'll cascade years worth of dirt and stour, so you swirl some Windolene on the double-glazing and make sure the neighbours don't get an eyeful.
I'd imagine that many a red-blooded farmer would trade in their best tractor to get an eyeful of RiRi.
STEAMY sex scenes aren't usually part of the Dail diary - but 14 TDs will get an eyeful this week when they visit the set of The Tudors.
For up to four hours, get an eyeful of the great landmarks, historical sites, fashionable residences and shopping areas of this fascinating and eclectic city.
A path lighted by smiling orange pumpkins leads through the garage to a small domed structure out back, where youngsters dipping into the candy bowl can also get an eyeful of the heavens.
It may not be art, but visitors to this new museum will certainly get an eyeful.
Angry neighbours get an eyeful as players strip to play on the floodlit pitches in Rutherglen, Glasgow.
So we get an eyeful of scantily clad women courting abuse from the men who desire their services.
The roses are so showy that police helicopters often swoop down low so officers can get an eyeful of color, and passing cars occasionally get rear-ended when the drivers slow to get a better look.
GET an eyeful of Suranne Jones in her latest role as sex therapist Linda Nelson.
TENNIS fans get an eyeful as a streaker whips off the covers at Wimbledon.