gentleman

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a gentleman and a scholar

Someone (usually a male, due to the gender implication of "gentleman") who is admirable or of high esteem. Although used sincerely as a compliment, it is generally bombastic and lighthearted in nature. Thank you for helping me move into the new house, you are truly a scholar and a gentleman.
See also: and, gentleman, scholar

a scholar and a gentleman

Someone (usually a male, due to the gender implication of "gentleman") who is admirable or of high esteem. Although used sincerely as a compliment, it is generally bombastic and lighthearted in nature. Thank you for helping me move into the new house, you are truly a scholar and a gentleman.
See also: and, gentleman, scholar

gentleman of the four outs

An upstart. The four "outs" in question (that the person is living without) are manners, money, credit, and wit. I can't stand the young new partner at the firm—I can see that he's a gentleman of the four outs.
See also: four, gentleman, of, out

gentleman's agreement

A legally non-binding arrangement that is guaranteed only by a verbal or mutually understood agreement by the parties involved. Though my father left me his entire estate in his will, I made a gentleman's agreement with my brother to share the wealth equally between us.
See also: agreement

gentleman's pact

A legally non-binding arrangement that is guaranteed only by a verbal or mutually understood agreement by the parties involved. Though my father left me his entire estate in his will, I made a gentleman's pact with my brother to share the wealth equally between us.

ladies and gentlemen

A phrase typically used to address a crowd or audience consisting of men and women. Ladies and gentlemen, please turn your attention to the main stage for the start of our show! Ladies and gentlemen, can I have your attention please?
See also: and, gentleman, lady

man/woman/gentleman/lady of leisure

Someone who has enough money that they do not need to work for a living, and therefore can spend their time however they please. The group mostly consists of ladies of leisure who use their time, money, and influence to help charity causes. I tried my hand at a variety of professions, but in the end, the life that suits me best is that of a man of leisure.
See also: gentleman, lady, leisure, man, of, woman

the little gentleman in the velvet coat

obsolete, literary A humorous name for the mole. The ground was dotted with tiny hills. "What is it that made these?" I asked my uncle. "Why, the little gentleman in the velvet coat," he replied, suppressing a smile.

a gentleman's agreement

or

a gentlemen's agreement

A gentleman's agreement or a gentlemen's agreement is an informal agreement that is not written down but in which people trust one another to do what they have promised. We had no contract; it was done by a gentleman's agreement. I'm hoping we can come to a gentlemen's agreement, Colonel.
See also: agreement

a gentleman's agreement

an arrangement or understanding which is based on the trust of both or all parties, rather than being legally binding.
1991 Charles Anderson Grain: Entrepreneurs There had been a ‘gentleman's agreement’ by the Grain Growers not to enter the markets of Saskatchewan Wheat Pool's predecessor.
See also: agreement

the little gentleman in the velvet coat

the mole. humorous
This expression was a toast used by the Jacobites, supporters of the deposed James II and his descendants in their claim to the British throne. It referred to the belief that the death of King William III resulted from complications following a fall from his horse when it stumbled over a molehill. The phrase is found in various other forms, including the wee gentleman in black velvet .

a ˌgentleman’s aˈgreement

(also a ˌgentlemen’s aˈgreement) an agreement, a contract, etc. in which nothing is written down because both people trust each other not to break it: ‘Why don’t you tell him you don’t want to sell it now?’ ‘I can’t possibly. It was a gentleman’s agreement and I must keep to it.’
See also: agreement

gentleman and a scholar, a

Well behaved and well educated. This term dates from the days when only well-born boys and men (or those who entered a religious order) received any education at all. Its earliest appearance in print was in George Peele’s Merrie Conceited Jests of 1607 (“He goes directly to the Mayor, tels him he was a Scholler and a Gentleman”). It probably was close to being a cliché by the time Robert Burns used it jokingly in his The Twa Dogs (1786): “His locked, letter’d braw brass collar shew’d him the gentleman an’ scholar.”
See also: and, gentleman

a gentleman and a scholar

A complimentary term for a person, especially one who has done you a favor. Back in the era when courteous behavior and academic achievement were prized far more highly than they are today, acknowledging a kindness, such as holding the door or relinquishing a place on line so that someone else could get a taxi, would be met with a smile, a nod, and the phrase, “You are a scholar and a gentleman.”
See also: and, gentleman, scholar
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, 46 per cent said they'd be put off their date if he didn't have gentlemanly habits and 10 per cent revealed it would be a deal breaker.
Novelist and former second lieutenant in the Brigade of Guards Tom Stacey says gentlemanly principles are timeless.
?THE greens will be manicured, the knitwear will be hideous and the gentlemanly etiquette will be stretched to its limits, but the Ryder Cup is one of our greatest pure sporting contests.
Speaking to TMZ Live, Cowell says he feels "not gentlemanly at all" as details of the yet-to-be released book - Sweet Revenge: The Intimate Life of Simon Cowell - hit the headlines.
Instead the singer, who is in a relationship with model Oliver Cheshire, goes for fellas who are "gentlemanly" around her and aren't arrogant.
But perhaps what sets Del Piero apart is his gentlemanly conduct on and off the field -- an aspect that has not gone unnoticed as he has been presented with at least three awards in Italy for gentlemanly conduct, along with the "Golden Foot" award which pertains to personality and playing ability.
In keeping with the gentlemanly nature of the game, Wisden elected to exclude Amir, Asif and Butt after the spot-fixing scandal in which they were caught up.
Naismith wanted to create a gentlemanly game without "shouldering, holding, pushing, or striking," where the ball "may be batted in any direction," and a "player cannot run with the ball" but "must throw it from the spot on which he catches it." His students developed dribbling on their own.
He could have commented in a more gentlemanly manner what he thought about shooting hens.
Along with his Ray-Bans and mess of curly brown hair, the spots connected the lines of his tough persona, toning down his old-soul grumble and buttoning up his adolescence with a dose of gentlemanly panache.
ENGLAND officials will rely on a "gentlemanly" approach to winning the right to host the 2018 World Cup - with a little bit of royal help from Princes William and Harry.
I believed if we had lost to Derby, he would have done the gentlemanly thing and resigned, however we won and were one point from the top of the league.
Well, gentlemanly behavior never goes un-rewarded on my watch, so I'd like to return the favor.
THE Fly on the Wall thought the invitation-only Derby Club, which meets for an evening's entertainment that includes auctioning horses in tomorrow's Classic, was the last bastion of gentlemanly good behaviour - until Wednesday night.
THE good news is that handsome Nathaniel Parker returns as the gentlemanly Inspector Lynley in another two episodes of the drama.