gaze

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contemplate (one's) navel

To be excessively focused on one's personal problems or concerns. Good luck getting John's attention—he's too busy contemplating his navel to help anybody else.
See also: contemplate, navel

fix (one) with a gaze

To look at one intensely. He fixed me with a gaze, and I found myself mesmerized by what he was saying.
See also: fix, gaze

fix (one) with a look

To look at one intensely. He fixed me with a look, and I found myself mesmerized by what he was saying.
See also: fix, look

fix (one) with a stare

To look at one intensely. He fixed me with a stare, and I found myself mesmerized by what he was saying.
See also: fix, stare

gaze (off) into space

To stare vacantly or absentmindedly at nothing in particular, usually while one is preoccupied with or distracted by thoughts of something else. I sat at the back of class, gazing off into space, when suddenly the solution came to me. He just gazed into space as his parents lectured him on the importance of paying attention during class.
See also: gaze, space

gaze around

To look around or survey a particular place or area. When we first got off the bus in New York City, we could only gaze around at all the skyscrapers in awe. The baby lay quietly in her crib, just gazing around.
See also: around, gaze

gaze around at (someone or something)

To look around at someone or something. The teacher gazed around at all the kids in the room and then announced who had gotten the solos. When we first got off the bus in New York City, we could only gaze around at all the skyscrapers in awe.
See also: around, gaze

gaze at (one's) navel

To be excessively focused on or preoccupied with one's personal problems or concerns. Good luck getting John's attention—he's too busy gazing at his navel to help anybody else.
See also: gaze, navel

gaze at (someone or something)

To look at someone or something. The teacher gazed at all the kids in the room and then announced who had gotten the solos. When we first got off the bus in New York City, we could only gaze at all the skyscrapers in awe.
See also: gaze

gaze on (someone or something)

To look at someone or something. The teacher gazed on the class and then announced who had gotten the solos. When we first got off the bus in New York City, we could only gaze on all the skyscrapers in awe.
See also: gaze, on

gaze open-mouthed

To stare intently at something or someone, often because one is awestruck or dumbfounded. I couldn't help but gaze open-mouthed at the beautiful sunrise.
See also: gaze

gaze out on (something)

To look or peer out at something. I sipped my coffee and gazed out on the snowy scene beyond my window. We stood on the balcony and gazed out on the New York City skyline in awe.
See also: gaze, on, out

male gaze

The rendering of art, literature, etc., from the perspective of and for the consumption of heterosexual males, especially characterized by the depiction of women as passive objects of desire and pleasure. The phrase was coined by film theorist Laura Mulvey. The male gaze will continue to dominate media until more and more women artists challenge the paradigm.
See also: gaze, male

meet (one's) gaze

To make eye contact with one, typically in a way that is confident or without shame. She couldn't meet my gaze because she knew how angry I was with her. When shaking hands with someone, you should always meet their gaze.
See also: gaze, meet

navel-gazing

The act of excessively focusing on one's personal problems or concerns, to the exclusion of other people or other issues. She said my navel-gazing was one of the biggest reasons she broke up with me. If our party is going to be successful in the future, then we can't be dragged down by navel-gazing about the loss of this election.

rivet (one's) gaze (on someone or something)

1. To capture and hold one's gaze or attention completely and for an extended period of time (on someone or something). The magician riveted our gaze on the mysterious box, as we waited with bated breath to see what would emerge. The film riveted my gaze from beginning to end.
2. To focus one's gaze or attention completely and continuously (on someone or something). I riveted my gaze on the television as the final seconds of the game ticked away. I don't think I could handle celebrity. Having thousands of people rivet their gaze on me every day sounds like a nightmare.
See also: gaze, rivet, someone

stare (off) into space

To stare vacantly or absentmindedly at nothing in particular, usually while one is preoccupied with or distracted by thoughts of something else. I sat at the back of class, staring off into space, when suddenly the solution came to me. He just stared into space as his parents lectured him on the importance of paying attention during class.
See also: space, stare

steely gaze

A prolonged and intense, mirthless look, especially one expressing disapproval or displeasure. The kids began joking about their classmate's situation, but the teacher silenced them with a steely gaze. I could tell by his steely gaze that he was not happy about the news.
See also: gaze, steely

gaze around (at someone or something)

to look all around at someone or something. The manager gazed around at each of us, and finally spoke. Tourists gazed around at the scenery for a while and got back in the bus. We just stood there, gazing around.
See also: around, gaze

gaze at someone or something

to stare at someone or something. I stood for an hour, gazing at the sea. She gazed at me for a moment and then smiled.
See also: gaze

gaze on someone or something

to look at someone or something; to survey someone or something. She gazed sullenly on the ruin that had been her home. The teacher gazed on the student and frightened her.
See also: gaze, on

gaze out on something

to look out on something, such as a lovely view, from inside a building or from a particular spot. She gazed out on the flowering trees and knew that life would go on. Henry sat for hours, gazing out on the lake.
See also: gaze, on, out

rivet one's gaze on someone or something

 and rivet one's glare on someone or something
Fig. to fasten one's gaze onto someone or something. (As if it were attached by rivets.) He riveted his gaze on the surly young man. Walter riveted his hateful glare on the last page of the contract and sneered.
See also: gaze, on, rivet

steely gaze

Cliché an intense, staring gaze. The principal turned a steely gaze toward the frightened student and suddenly smiled.
See also: gaze, steely

navel-gazing

or

navel-contemplation

If you accuse someone of navel-gazing or navel-contemplation, you are criticizing them for thinking only about themselves and their own problems or activities, rather than the problems or activities of other people. Tory MP Martin Brison says he is more interested in developing policies for the future than in navel-gazing about the past. He called for an end to Labor's post-election navel-gazing. Note: Navel-gazing can be used before a noun. The film is a sort of navel-gazing look at Hollywood. Note: You can also say that someone gazes at their navel or contemplates their navel. The Institute has always been notorious for contemplating its own navel. Note: These expressions are used to show disapproval. Note: Your navel is your tummy button or belly button.

fix somebody with a ˈlook, ˈstare, ˈgaze, etc.

look directly at somebody for a long time: He fixed her with an angry stare.
See also: fix, somebody

look/stare/gaze into ˈspace

look straight in front of you without looking at a particular thing, usually because you are thinking about something: I asked her twice if she was ready to leave but she just sat there staring into space.
See also: gaze, look, space, stare
References in periodicals archive ?
Look at a gazing globe and you'll have a fish-eye view of everything except what's directly behind the globe.
To measure the accuracy with which home appliances can be selected, experiments were conducted for two cases: users gazing and not gazing at a home appliance.
They sit this way, gazing at one another, for two hours.
Tipples presented neutral, fearful, or happy expressions gazing right or left, following neutral faces gazing straight ahead.
Laura Mulvey has famously posited that, when gazing at women on the screen, male spectators escape their fear of lack of the phallus--their fear of castration--by either voyeurism or "the substitution of a fetish object" (438).
Of course, literally speaking, it is not "the gaze" that communicates, but the persons doing the gazing. Nevertheless, reflecting on the gaze rather than on the people gazing can be useful.
Stuby seems to base her assumption about the gender-specificity of the speaker and the object of his gaze on cues from established critics such as Dolores Rosenblum, whose work on Rossetti's devotional poetry notes that "the metaphor of sight, particularly as it involves gazing upon a face, belongs ...
Therefore, this paper employs components of Mulvey's approach in conjunction with two other approaches--star theory and gay/lesbian studies--to examine several key instances of gazing in director Marcel Carne's super-production Les Enfants du Paradis (1945).
Gazing on the scene, the narrator relies on no speech between the two characters; in fact it is the intrusion of language--Hall's name called from the court--that abruptly ends this entirely physical interchange.
The "gazing" nature of social institutions, be they work, or marriage, or the media, or popular culture, present numerous images of the female gaze not linked to motherhood.
Thus, rather than having her subjectivity eclipsed in the tableau's structure, Lily uses the tableau to stage her subjectivity, and her experience as an eyewitness (indeed as an "I"-witness) during the scene exposes the tension between her individual acts of gazing and a Realist ideology committed to a "common vision" of reality.
He then explores three separate changes in the ways corpses were "imagined." New religious interpretations emphasized the liberation of the spirit from the body; linking death to natural processes reduced the fear of death; and sensational literature linked death with sex and violence while medical men justified gazing on the body for knowledge.
When I look at an object [text], the object is always already gazing at me, and from a point at which I cannot see it" (109).
The term was first broached by Laura Mulvey in her essay "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema," which first appeared in 1975.(4) Mulvey's topic was the controlling, organizing look of the camera, the gaze of desire taking pleasure in gazing. Her main target in that essay was how men represent women in film.
Sometimes he is slightly smiling, but mostly he just gazes at me gazing, his entire face lit.