gasser

(redirected from gassers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

gas

slang Especially funny, humorous, or entertaining. Primarily heard in Ireland. A: "So then I tell yer man that he'd be better off walking home!" B: "Ha, that's gas, Rory!" You haven't met Sarah? You'll love her, she's gas!

gasser

Something that is fun or enjoyable. Your birthday party was a real gasser!
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

gas

1. n. intestinal gas. The baby has gas and will cry for a while longer.
2. n. nonsense. Hey, that’s about enough of your gas.
3. in. to talk nonsense; to brag. (see also gasbag.) Stop gassing for a minute and listen.
4. in. to have a good time. We gassed all evening.
5. and gasser n. a joke; a prank; a wild time. What a gas! I had a great time.
6. n. liquor, especially inferior liquor. Pour me a little more of that gas, will you?
7. and gas up in. to drink excessively; to get drunk. I come home every night and find that you’ve been gassing all day. He gassed up for a couple of hours while waiting for the plane.

gasser

verb
See gas
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Other stories proliferated: the gasser was a mental patient, an inventor testing a new discovery, kids pulling off a prank, or even an ape-man, a theory that came from a long history of reported Bigfoot-like sightings in central Illinois.
After Wright's statement and after other authorities announced their belief that many of the incidents were based on hysteria, the number of reported gasser incidents dropped substantially.
A 1945 article in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology explored the Mad Gasser of Mattoon as a study in mass hysteria.
The Austro-Hungarian army needed a more modern sidearm, and as it had for the past 30 years, it looked to the Gasser firm to supply it.
The Infanterie-Revolver M.98 was designed by a Gasser employee August Rast who, in 1903, became a partner in the firm, the company's name then becoming Waffen-fabrik Rast & Gasser.
Shortly after the turn of the 20th century, Rast & Gasser produced a version of the M.98 with a swing-out cylinder ("Zylinder und ausschaltbarer Griffstucksicherung") but the demands of the upcoming Great War forced the company to concentrate completely on production of the M.98 revolver and only limited numbers of the swing-out cylinder design were sold to some Austrian police forces.
At a reunion of the Gassers on September 27, 2001, in Oklahoma City, Bobby Morgan expressed his deep appreciation of the coaching and character of his boyhood Gasser manager, Roy Deal.
With Dale Mitchell in their lineup the next Sunday, the Gassers played the semipros of Clinton.
During summer 1940 Dale Mitchell hit over .500 for the Gassers. He was awarded a statuette proclaiming him Oklahoma City's most popular sandlotter, edging out his first base teammate Joe Bauman.
The Model 1898 Rast & Gasser was designed by August Rast and manufactured in Vienna at the Gasser factory.
Chambered for eight 8mm Gasser cartridges, the lockwork of this extremely well-made double-action was robust and easily serviced by simply pulling down on the rear of the triggerguard to release and open a hinged sideplate, at which point all would be revealed.
In 1873 Gasser introduced a new design which, while it still utilized the Lefaucheux trigger mechanism, had a solid frame and did away with the cumbersome ejector rod on the side of the barrel.
In order to address the seemingly endless demand for weapons from the kingdoms, warlords and tribal warriors of the Balkans, the following year, Gasser introduced what was to become its best-known product.
Gasser also made the revolver commercially, and these became particularly hot items when M.70s were purchased in large numbers by Montenegro.
In any event, plucky Montenegro's fight against the Turks and subsequent independence gave the Gasser revolver quite a cachet among the intelligentsia, and variations, made by Gasser as well as Belgian imitators, became all the rage on the continent.