gasser

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gas

1. n. intestinal gas. The baby has gas and will cry for a while longer.
2. n. nonsense. Hey, that’s about enough of your gas.
3. in. to talk nonsense; to brag. (see also gasbag.) Stop gassing for a minute and listen.
4. in. to have a good time. We gassed all evening.
5. and gasser n. a joke; a prank; a wild time. What a gas! I had a great time.
6. n. liquor, especially inferior liquor. Pour me a little more of that gas, will you?
7. and gas up in. to drink excessively; to get drunk. I come home every night and find that you’ve been gassing all day. He gassed up for a couple of hours while waiting for the plane.

gasser

verb
See gas
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1878 Franz Joseph's military establishment issued small numbers of a 9mm revolver designed by Alfred Kropascheck and Johann Gasser to its gendarmerie, but for the most part the 1870/74 remained preeminent.
The Model 1898 Rast & Gasser was designed by August Rast and manufactured in Vienna at the Gasser factory.
Chambered for eight 8mm Gasser cartridges, the lockwork of this extremely well-made double-action was robust and easily serviced by simply pulling down on the rear of the triggerguard to release and open a hinged sideplate, at which point all would be revealed.
Though overshadowed by the Model 1912 Steyr Hahn auto, the Rast & Gasser saw widespread use by Austro-Hungarian forces during World War I.
The Austro-Hungarian army needed a more modern sidearm, and as it had for the past 30 years, it looked to the Gasser firm to supply it.
98 was designed by a Gasser employee August Rast who, in 1903, became a partner in the firm, the company's name then becoming Waffen-fabrik Rast & Gasser.
Shortly after the turn of the 20th century, Rast & Gasser produced a version of the M.
During the conflict, Gasser revolvers also saw service with the armies and irregular forces of, Albania, Bulgaria, Greece, Montenegro and Turkey.
Austrian gunmaker Leopold Gasser began making firearms in the mid-1800s, and though he died in 1871, his company was successfully continued by his son Johann.
Gasser also made the revolver commercially, and these became particularly hot items when M.
In any event, plucky Montenegro's fight against the Turks and subsequent independence gave the Gasser revolver quite a cachet among the intelligentsia, and variations, made by Gasser as well as Belgian imitators, became all the rage on the continent.
In addition to having the usual Gasser markings, Montenegrin-issue pieces will be seen with a crown and "NI," for Nicholas I.
In 1873 Gasser introduced a new design which, while it still utilized the Lefaucheux trigger mechanism, had a solid frame and did away with the cumbersome ejector rod on the side of the barrel.
In order to address the seemingly endless demand for weapons from the kingdoms, warlords and tribal warriors of the Balkans, the following year, Gasser introduced what was to become its best-known product.
Prince, later King, Nikola I (1841-1921) of Montenegro obtained a license from Gasser making him the sole importer of their products into his country.