gargle


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gargle

1. in. to drink liquor. They sat and gargled for an hour or two.
2. n. liquor; a drink of liquor. You want some more gargle?

gargle factory

n. a saloon; a tavern. Gary spends a lot of time at the gargle factory.
See also: factory, gargle
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of the study was to evaluate efficacy of ketamine gargle for attenuating postoperative sore throat in patients undergoing general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation.
Boghossian, a former retail food and luxury goods executive, says she used principles from food retailing to develop Gargle Away, an advanced formula gargle available in preportioned single-serve K-Cups and packets.
Eventually, I came up with a pretty potent and effective throat gargle recipe I would take with me on business trips,” says Juliet A.
And at the appropriate time, I tottered off to the toilet for a gargle of the green stuff.
Subjects told to gargle thrice daily for a study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2005 saw the incidence of upper respiratory tract infections drop 40 percent compared with participants who didn't gargle.
VINEGAR: Gargle with a mouthful of warm vinegar with half a tablespoon of salt for about 30 seconds, three times a day.
I guess you'll just have to do a Gargle search for it.
Controls were asked to gargle with normal saline if they could not produce sputum.
Gargle with one tablespoon of cider vinegar and one teaspoon of salt dissolved in a glass of warm water.
This shock-and-awe ride will make you squeal, scream, laugh and gargle," added The Simpsons creator Matt Groening as a human cannonball, fireworks, a jazz band and confetti combined to launch the maniacal 4-D journey.
Soluble aspirin can be used to gargle with if you have a sore throat.
They took 124 people over the age of 65 who were living in a nursing home and gave half of them an extract made from tea to gargle with three times a day for three months.
A compound of oregano oil called carvacrol is a powerful antiseptic and so can be used as a gargle to soothe sore throats or mouth inflammations.
In a randomized, controlled trial involving 387 healthy volunteers aged 18-65 years, a URTI occurred in 41% of control subjects, 30% of subjects randomized to gargle with water, and 37% of subjects randomized to gargle with diluted povidone-iodine during a 60-day period.
Add 1/4 teaspoon of cayenne pepper to 1 cup of boiling water; stir well and let the child gargle while the mixture is warm.