gargle


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gargle

1. in. to drink liquor. They sat and gargled for an hour or two.
2. n. liquor; a drink of liquor. You want some more gargle?

gargle factory

n. a saloon; a tavern. Gary spends a lot of time at the gargle factory.
See also: factory, gargle
References in periodicals archive ?
According to independent laboratory, Food Safety Net Services, “The antimicrobial action of Gargle Away's formula reduced the S.
tuberculosis was cultured from sputum or gargle specimens from 3 (0.
Gargle with a little of this solution three times a day.
Thyme is strongly antiseptic and thus can be used externally for infected wounds, internally for respiratory and digestive infections, and as a gargle to relieve sore throats.
At an early age you saw me gargling with water, and you wanted to gargle too.
of warm water, and then gargle in small sips for 20-30 seconds until the liquid is gone.
7 Don't gargle - it really doesn't help, and the alcohol that's in some gargles may actually cause more irritation.
My most vivid memory was being prescribed that horrible purple gargle that me and my brother and sister got when we had a dose of tonsillitis.
She said: "My mum got me to gargle bicarbonate of soda and water.
I smoke an awful lot of cigarettes and I drink like a fish, and I gargle brandy on stage.
The police found the bottle in the back of her car but agreed to drop the charges of having an open intoxicant in the vehicle, thus making it safe once again for the rest of us who enjoy a gargle while behind the wheel.
Calendula tea alone or with myrrh can be used as a gargle for gum, mouth, and throat infections.
The only thing I didn't enjoy was when Mrs Lees used to make us gargle twice a week in salt water.