gallop

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at a snail's gallop

Very slowly. Snails are known for moving very slowly. My research is moving at a snail's gallop—every experiment I've tried so far has failed. We'll never get there on time with you driving at a snail's gallop!
See also: gallop

at a snail's pace

Very slowly (as a snail is known to move very slowly). My research is moving at a snail's pace—every experiment I've tried so far has failed. We'll never get there on time with you driving at a snail's pace!
See also: pace

break into a gallop

Of a horse, to begin running (i.e. "galloping"). The inexperienced rider found herself clutching the reins when her horse broke into a gallop.
See also: break, gallop

gallop through (something)

1. Literally, to travel on horseback very quickly through some place or area. (A "gallop" is a running stride by a horse.) My horse galloped through the countryside while I clung to the reins in terror.
2. By extension, to do something hastily and, often, sloppily. I can tell you galloped through this essay—look at all these spelling errors!
See also: gallop, through
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

at a snail's pace

 and at a snail's gallop
very slowly. Things are moving along at a snail's pace here, but we'll finish on time—have no fear. Poor old Wally is creeping at a snail's gallop because his car has a flat tire.
See also: pace

break into a gallop

[for a horse] to begin to gallop; [for a horse] to speed up to a gallop. The pony broke into a gallop, racing to get home. Near the stables, the horse broke into a fast gallop.
See also: break, gallop

gallop through something

 
1. Lit. [for a horse] to pass through something at a gallop. Her horse galloped through the garden and dumped her in the cabbages. A few horses galloped through the meadow.
2. Fig. to go through something quickly; to do or perform something rapidly and perhaps carelessly. Mike galloped through his song and left the stage in a hurry. Don't just gallop through your homework!
See also: gallop, through
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

at a snail's pace

COMMON If something is moving or happening at a snail's pace, it is moving or happening very slowly. The vote counting continues at a snail's pace but already clear results are emerging. The economy grew at a snail's pace in the first three months of this year. She was driving at a snail's pace, looking in every house. Note: You can also use snail's pace before a noun. Observers hope that the meeting will speed up two years of snail's-pace progress. Note: You usually use this expression when you think that it would be better if it went more quickly.
See also: pace
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

at a snail's pace

extremely slowly.
See also: pace
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at a ˈsnail’s pace

(informal) very slowly: My grandmother drove the car at a snail’s pace.
See also: pace
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

at a snail’s pace

and at a snail’s gallop
mod. very slowly. Poor old Willy is creeping at a snail’s gallop because his car has a flat tire. The building project is coming along at a snail’s pace.
See also: pace

at a snail’s gallop

verb
See also: gallop
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

at a snail's pace

Very slowly. The slowness of snails was pointed out about 200 b.c. by the Roman poet Plautus and the term “snail’s pace” in English goes back to about 1400. Relative to its size, however, a snail travels a considerable distance each day, using the undersurface of its muscular foot to propel itself.
See also: pace
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Loose horses have escaped on to the track having lost their riders on the training grounds before, but Hensey claimed that in his nine years in the job he had never encountered evidence suggesting horses had galloped without permission.
Tranquil Tiger appeared to have not read the script quite right as he galloped along in front, but the Prince of Wales's Stakes and Hardwicke Stakes possibles were closing the gap quite readily in the closing stages without being asked for too much effort.
Centennial galloped alone, as did Racketeer, who was not asked too much in his spin.
I let him off the lead, and he galloped 150 yards, no problem.
Warren Place will be double-handed at Epsom, with Beat Hollow joined by Wellbeing, who galloped on strongly for Willie Ryan to finish four or five lengths clear of Sandmason and one other over the same stretch of ground.
Primo Valentino galloped in company with the five-year-old gelding Volontiers, and he lengthened nicely at the finish to come home two or three lengths to the good.