fudge

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fudge packer

offensive slang A derogatory term for a homosexual male.
See also: fudge

fudge the issue

To dodge or avoid doing something. The phrase often has a connotation of deceit. The finance department is fudging the issue for now, but once news reaches the CEO, they will have to admit whatever they did to make these figures so impressive. I know you didn't do any of the chores I assigned you, and you can't fudge the issue any longer!
See also: fudge, issue

pack fudge

vulgar slang To have anal sex.
See also: fudge, pack

fudge factor

Room for error or mistakes. I'm not very good at math, so I always leave a fudge factor when I'm tallying up my expenditures for the month.
See also: factor, fudge

fudge factor

Fig. a margin of error. I never use a fudge factor. I measure correctly, and I cut the material exactly the way I measured it. I built in a fudge factor of three percent.
See also: factor, fudge

fudge factor

a figure which is included in a calculation in order to account for some unquantified but significant phenomenon or to ensure a desired result.
Fudge, apparently originating in the mid 18th century as an exclamation of disgust or irritation, later acquired a specific verbal sense in printers' jargon, meaning to ‘do work imperfectly or as best you can with the materials available’.
See also: factor, fudge

fudge

(fədʒ)
1. in. to cheat; to deceive (someone). (Disguise of fuck.) Bill, you’re fudging. Wait till the starting gun fires.
2. n. nonsense; deception. I’ve heard enough of your fudge. Let’s get honest, okay?

fudge factor

n. a margin of error. I never use a fudge factor. I measure correctly, and I cut the material exactly the way I measured it.
See also: factor, fudge
References in periodicals archive ?
She currently employs one member of staff, Jill Wall, who makes the fudge, and two part-time packers and is supported by her parents.
Already taking the UK ice cream market by storm these decadent, scrumptious fruity morsels of fudge pieces can also be used in a range of other applications including bakery, cereal, frozen desserts and as additions to other confectionery items such as chocolate, for an even more indulgent finished product.
"Often customers suggest recipes, like jelly baby fudge," says Jody.
TEMPTATION: (From left) manager Jody Yurkwich and owner Debbie Garner show off a tray of home-made fudge at The Toffee Shop at Hatton Country World; YUM YUM: A tray of chocolate egg fudge
All translators who've worked with the Nights , Fudge said, have had to deal with the "stylistic poverty"that Borges notes above in one way or another.
The "treasures and pleasures" of the Nights, Fudge said, arenot in the quality of itslanguage.
Butwhy, Fudge asks, wasn't this "stylistic poverty" a problem in the Arabic?
Fudge was asked, after his talk, about how all this appliesto his translation of The 101 Nights.
Translators have gone in different directions, Fudge noted, with the most recent English translation trying to speed things up a bit, while also being the most strictly faithful.
In his talk, Fudge examineda few momentswhere thetranslationsdiverged.
In any case, habaq , Fudgesays, may be "basil, mint, or some other sweet-smelling plant sometimes growing near the water." Jisr or jusur usually refers to a bridge, "but it can also be embankment, bank, or causeway." So, Fudge said, he reads habaq al-jusur as something like: fragrant herbs sloping down to a moist indentation.
In the contest between the versions, Fudge gives greater credit to the alliterative "le basilic du brave" and"the basil of the bridges," although his own looser translation seems a better and more evocative use of language.
Overall, Fudge seemed to prefer the 2005 French version, saying he found in Lyons and Lyons "a fidelity to the plain prose and literal sense of the words but a passivity...that is at odds with the action being described.
In the end, Fudge returned to Borges, who evincedthe lowestopinion ofEnno Littmann's German version of the Nights .
So, Fudge said, "if Galland appears frugal," then "the Lyons and Bencheikh-Miquel are positively parsimonious."