the fruits of (one's) labor

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the fruits of (one's) labor

The outcome or rewards of one's work or efforts. You worked hard this semester, and straight A's are the fruits of your labor. Please, have some fresh strawberries—they're the fruits of my labor in the garden.
See also: fruit, labor, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fruits of one's labor(s)

Fig. the results of one's work. We displayed the fruits of our labor at the county fair. What have you accomplished? Where is the fruit of your labors?
See also: fruit, labor, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
What made America great in the past, and what can make America even greater in the future, is a widespread cultural recognition and adoption of the principle of individual rights, including the right to dispose of the fruits of one's labor as one sees fit.
The central component of Douglass' worldview was the principle of self-ownership, which he understood to include both racial equality and the right to enjoy the fruits of one's labor.
Some Republicans have forgotten how President Ronald Reagan praised unions three decades ago on a visit to Poland for their critical role in protecting "the right to work and reap the fruits of one's labor, the right to assemble, the right to strike and the right to freedom of expression."
And her 2009 show "Fruchte der Arbeit" (Fruits of One's Labor) took Johann Konig's gallery to another level.
Of course, one is very well entitled to one's opinion, but I suspect that very few would concur, since most would believe that the fruits of one's labor are not an ephemeral privilege but rather a perennial and inalienable right.
"The aspect of new product development that is the most rewarding is seeing the fruits of one's labor end up on store shelves or on menus.
Likewise they stand for the belief that the fruits of one's labor belong to one...period!
Ownership of the fruits of one's labor is essential to liberty.
THE GOLDEN years, thought to be a time to relax and enjoy the fruits of one's labors, are in jeopardy.
"What set America apart from other lands was freedom for the individual--freedom to work, to produce, to succeed, and especially to keep the fruits of one's labors," McManus points out.