frown

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frown at (someone or something)

1. To look at someone or something with displeasure. Ted frowned at me as though I was the one who'd made that callous remark. Sadie frowned at the math problem that was giving her trouble.
2. To express or exhibit disapproval of someone or something. I just know my mother frowns at my decision, but it's what I want. If people frown at such relationships, they're just living in the past.
See also: frown

frown on (something)

To disapprove or show one's disapproval of something. I just know my mother frowns on my decision to go to a state school. If people frown on such relationships, they're just living in the past.
See also: frown, on

frown upon

To show one's disapproval of something. I just know my mother frowns upon my decision to go to a state school. Please stop frowning upon my choice and support me!
See also: frown, upon
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

frown at someone or something

to scowl at someone or something. Please don't frown at me. I didn't do anything. Frank frowned at the dog and gave it a kick.
See also: frown

frown on someone or something

to disapprove of someone or something; to show displeasure or disapproval of someone or something. The Internal Revenue Service frowns on tax cheaters. Aunt Clara always seemed to frown on my cousin for some reason.
See also: frown, on
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

frown on

Regard with disapproval or distaste, as in Pat frowns on bad language. this idiom transfers the disapproving facial expression to the thought it expresses. [Late 1500s]
See also: frown, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

frown on

or frown upon
v.
To disapprove of something: The administration frowns on late submissions of the required forms. My parents frown upon loud music.
See also: frown, on
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Participants also reported a higher perceived effort when frowning than smiling or when attempting to relax their hands and upper body.
Whenever necessary, frowning was explained as bringing the eyebrows together and down.
And, of course, they're frowning. I'm not sure what a Toilet Face should be.
And then Mrs Groves read that researchers at the University of Cardiff had concluded that Botox anti-wrinkle treatment on the forehead may actually make people feel happier by preventing frowning.
Pictures of children smiling or frowning, with their mouth open or looking away will now be accepted.
Some physicians are using Botox to treat facial wrinkles that aren't caused by frowning. "The safety and effectiveness of Botox injections into other regions of the face and neck, alone or in combination with the frown-lines region, have not been clinically evaluated," says the FDA.
Anxiety behaviors were operationally defined as nail biting, crying, frowning, avoiding new situations, and flat/negative affect.
GLBT people are not present in any of the research cited as justification for the new policies favoring marriage and frowning on out-of-wedlock births.
Can't speak for Arsenal, but no-one at Liverpool was frowning. They saw it for what it was.
Chris was still frowning but had not, so far, lunged forward to pummel his brother.
The Crybabies: Expect a lot of frowning, withdrawing, going off on tirades--even tears--when they don't get their way.
BEFORE; Sharon was so used to frowning and concentrating hard that she developed permanent deep lines; AFTER; Injections of Botox and a special filler relaxed her muscles giving her a smooth, younger complexion
Participants first viewed a series of frowning faces presented subliminally so the researchers could determine baseline neural activity.
The authors' claim is prefaced by the frowning observation that "[n]ot all sectors of the population participated equally in Renaissance culture." How surprising.