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foam at the mouth

1. Literally, to produce foam from one's mouth, as due to a disease or other ailment. All of a sudden she collapsed in a fit, convulsing and foaming at the mouth.
2. Figuratively, to be viciously and uncontrollably angry or upset. The protesters had formed outside the courthouse, foaming at the mouth as the alleged murderer made his way up the steps.
See also: foam, mouth

froth at the mouth

1. Literally, to produce foam from one's mouth, as due to a disease or other ailment. All of a sudden she collapsed in a fit, convulsing and frothing at the mouth.
2. Figuratively, to be viciously and uncontrollably angry or upset. The protesters had formed outside the courthouse, frothing at the mouth as the alleged murderer made his way up the steps.
See also: froth, mouth

froth up

1. To form into a foamy lather. How much heat do I need to use to get the milk to froth up?
2. To cause something to form into a foamy lather. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "froth" and "up." Do you have anything I can use to froth up the milk for my latte?
See also: froth, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

foam at the mouth

 
1. Lit. to create froth or foam around the mouth, as with some diseases. The poor dog was foaming at the mouth and looked quite dangerous. What does it mean when a cow foams at the mouth?
2. Fig. to be extraordinarily angry. She was almost foaming at the mouth when she heard about the cost of the car repairs. Walter was foaming at the mouth with rage.
See also: foam, mouth

froth something up

to whip or aerate something until it is frothy. Froth the milk up before you add it to the sauce. Froth up the milk before you pour it in.
See also: froth, up

froth up

[for something] to build up a froth when whipped, aerated, or boiled. The mixture began to froth up as Dan beat it. The milk frothed up as the steam went through it.
See also: froth, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

foam at the mouth

Be extremely angry, as in She was foaming at the mouth over the judge's ruling. This hyperbolic term uses the verb foam in the sense of "froth at the mouth," a usage generally applied to animals such as horses and dating from about a.d. 950. [1400s]
See also: foam, mouth
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

foam at the mouth

or

froth at the mouth

1. If someone foams at the mouth or froths at the mouth, they are very angry. Stewart was still foaming at the mouth about the incident when we spoke. The mere mention of `political correctness' is enough to cause journalists to froth at the mouth.
2. If someone foams at the mouth or froths at the mouth, they are very excited about something. The news that the team's top player is up for sale at the end of the season has got Premier League bosses foaming at the mouth in excitement. A new vintage home store has got A-list celebrities frothing at the mouth with excitement. Note: To foam or froth at the mouth literally means to produce a lot of foam or froth in the form of saliva. This is associated especially with having the disease rabies.
See also: foam, mouth
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

froth (or foam) at the mouth

be very angry.
This phrase stems from the involuntary production of large amounts of saliva from the mouth during a seizure or fit.
See also: froth, mouth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

foam at the ˈmouth

(informal) be extremely angry: He stood there foaming at the mouth. I’ve never seen anybody so angry.
If an animal foams at the mouth, it has a mass of small bubbles in and around its mouth, especially because it is very ill or angry.
See also: foam, mouth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

froth up

v.
1. To become frothy or foamy: The vinegar quickly frothed up when I added the baking soda.
2. To cause something to become frothy or foamy: The spinning blades of the blender frothed up the juice. You need to stir vigorously in order to froth the sauce up.
See also: froth, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

froth

n. a beer. How about another pitcher of frost, innkeeper?
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Concentrate grade is one of the most important production indices for froth flotation processes, which is generally measured offline through artificially timed testing of the content of valuable minerals.
Froth flotation is a kind of ore dressing process based on the different hydrophobic nature of its composed particles, involving complicated physicochemical reactions.
The two inter-related factors that principally govern the flotation process are the hydrodynamic states of the pulp (i.e., bubbly liquid) and froth phases, and the colloidal interactions between particles and bubbles.
A Denver DR floatation machine was used to perform froth floatation.
Although the use of conventional process aids, such as caustic, does improve bitumen recovery and bitumen froth quality, they lead to difficulties in tailings treatment by dispersing the fine particles in the tailings.
In the 1950s, Smith demonstrated the usefulness of soap froths as analogies for metal crystals.
J., "Experimental Techniques for Studying the Structure of Foams and Froths," Adv.
In many cases, a metal's grain structurelooks a lot like a soap froth, and sometimes it behaves like one.
Jameson, "A Study of Bubble Coalescence in Flotation Froths," Int.
Froth transport is essential to recover concentrates into launders and froth mobility may be adjusted by chemical additions, the use of paddles and/or booster cones as in the Outokumpu HG technology.
The researchers have also observed a dramatic "melting" transition, in which a front sweeps through an orderly lattice of magnetized cells, leaving behind a disordered magnetic froth. "These transitions are analogous to the melting of solids induced by changing the pressure while holding the temperature fixed," Babcock says.
The mineral slurry is treated with appropriate chemical reagents to render one of the minerals non-wetting, or hydrophobic, and these attach to air bubbles and float to the top of the flotation cell where they are recovered in the froth. The stirring mechanism acts to keep the particles in suspension and draws air into the pulp, though some designs utilize an external blower to introduce the air.