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foam at the mouth

1. Literally, to produce foam from one's mouth, as due to a disease or other ailment. All of a sudden she collapsed in a fit, convulsing and foaming at the mouth.
2. Figuratively, to be viciously and uncontrollably angry or upset. The protesters had formed outside the courthouse, foaming at the mouth as the alleged murderer made his way up the steps.
See also: foam, mouth

froth at the mouth

1. Literally, to produce foam from one's mouth, as due to a disease or other ailment. All of a sudden she collapsed in a fit, convulsing and frothing at the mouth.
2. Figuratively, to be viciously and uncontrollably angry or upset. The protesters had formed outside the courthouse, frothing at the mouth as the alleged murderer made his way up the steps.
See also: froth, mouth

froth up

1. To form into a foamy lather. How much heat do I need to use to get the milk to froth up?
2. To cause something to form into a foamy lather. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "froth" and "up." Do you have anything I can use to froth up the milk for my latte?
See also: froth, up
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

foam at the mouth

 
1. Lit. to create froth or foam around the mouth, as with some diseases. The poor dog was foaming at the mouth and looked quite dangerous. What does it mean when a cow foams at the mouth?
2. Fig. to be extraordinarily angry. She was almost foaming at the mouth when she heard about the cost of the car repairs. Walter was foaming at the mouth with rage.
See also: foam, mouth

froth something up

to whip or aerate something until it is frothy. Froth the milk up before you add it to the sauce. Froth up the milk before you pour it in.
See also: froth, up

froth up

[for something] to build up a froth when whipped, aerated, or boiled. The mixture began to froth up as Dan beat it. The milk frothed up as the steam went through it.
See also: froth, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

foam at the mouth

Be extremely angry, as in She was foaming at the mouth over the judge's ruling. This hyperbolic term uses the verb foam in the sense of "froth at the mouth," a usage generally applied to animals such as horses and dating from about a.d. 950. [1400s]
See also: foam, mouth
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

foam at the mouth

or

froth at the mouth

1. If someone foams at the mouth or froths at the mouth, they are very angry. Stewart was still foaming at the mouth about the incident when we spoke. The mere mention of `political correctness' is enough to cause journalists to froth at the mouth.
2. If someone foams at the mouth or froths at the mouth, they are very excited about something. The news that the team's top player is up for sale at the end of the season has got Premier League bosses foaming at the mouth in excitement. A new vintage home store has got A-list celebrities frothing at the mouth with excitement. Note: To foam or froth at the mouth literally means to produce a lot of foam or froth in the form of saliva. This is associated especially with having the disease rabies.
See also: foam, mouth
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

froth (or foam) at the mouth

be very angry.
This phrase stems from the involuntary production of large amounts of saliva from the mouth during a seizure or fit.
See also: froth, mouth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

foam at the ˈmouth

(informal) be extremely angry: He stood there foaming at the mouth. I’ve never seen anybody so angry.
If an animal foams at the mouth, it has a mass of small bubbles in and around its mouth, especially because it is very ill or angry.
See also: foam, mouth
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

froth up

v.
1. To become frothy or foamy: The vinegar quickly frothed up when I added the baking soda.
2. To cause something to become frothy or foamy: The spinning blades of the blender frothed up the juice. You need to stir vigorously in order to froth the sauce up.
See also: froth, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

froth

n. a beer. How about another pitcher of frost, innkeeper?
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The guide will include information on how milk interacts with coffee and on how to treat milk properly to obtain the best frothing. It also will contain suggestions on how to combine dairy products with coffee to create new products.
Also equipment for pouring, casting, bead laying, frothing, potting, spraying, RIM, and RTM.
Right now, there are three new appliances that make frothing milk by hand seem as quaint as baking a loaf of bread.
The only thing that worried me in the article was that Miss Jones did not mention the words "switch off" or "flick over, " for the only true defence against these "frothing" bits of loathsome humbug is a blank screen.
The materials are also used to stabilize the resulting polymer latex and others are used as frothing agents.
The stirring action also shears the air into small bubbles, which are stabilized by the addition of a frothing agent to the water phase.
A MOTHER called for police help when her teenage son became so angry he started frothing at the mouth.
Two stainless-steel-lined ThermoBlock heating systems eliminate downtime between brewing and frothing. The 50-square-inch warming plate on top of the machine can pre-warm and hold up to eight espresso cups at a time.
Several different types of frothers are available today, but the basic principles remain the same--milk is quickly aerated by either a mesh plunger or a frothing disc in order to create a rich, billowy froth.
With the frothXpress system, frothing and steaming milk for lattes and cappuccinos is completely automatic cup after cup.
Other key developments were the introduction of frothing technology by DuPont in 1961, which allowed for faster cavity filling and lower and more uniform foam densities.
The very last step that required a tiny amount of labor, frothing or steaming the milk, has now been eliminated with the introduction of the Jura-Capresso Impressa Z5, which makes cappuccinos or lattes with one push of a button.