frost

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frost (someone)

To cause someone to become angry, agitated, or annoyed. My sister really frosted me by using the last of my shampoo—again!
See also: frost

frosted

Angry, agitated, or annoyed. I'm frosted because you used the last of my shampoo—again!
See also: frost

frost over

To become coated with a thin layer of ice. If the ground frosts over tonight, we'll have a much harder time digging into it tomorrow.
See also: frost, over

frost up

1. To become coated with a thin layer of ice. If the ground frosts up tonight, we'll have a much harder time digging into it tomorrow.
2. To cause something to become coated with a thin layer of ice. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "frost" and "up." I'm worried that the cold temperatures tonight will frost the ground up.
See also: frost, up

frost over

to become covered with frost. The windows had all frosted over in the night. The car windows frosted over.
See also: frost, over

frosted (over)

Sl. angry; annoyed. The clerk was really frosted over when I asked for a better one. Why was he so frosted?
See also: frost

frost over

v.
To become covered with frost: The blades of grass frosted over in the cold night air.
See also: frost, over

frost up

v.
1. To become covered with frost: The windows frosted up quickly when the temperature dropped.
2. To cause something to become covered with frost: The freezing air frosted up the windows. Our breath frosted the mirrors up.
See also: frost, up

frost

tv. to make someone angry. (see also frosted (over).) The little car frosted me by zooming into my parking place.

frosted (over)

mod. angry; annoyed. The clerk was really frosted over when I asked for a better one.
See also: frost, over

frosted

verb
See also: frost
References in classic literature ?
With the aurora borealis flaming coldly overhead, or the stars leaping in the frost dance, and the land numb and frozen under its pall of snow, this song of the huskies might have been the defiance of life, only it was pitched in minor key, with long- drawn wailings and half-sobs, and was more the pleading of life, the articulate travail of existence.
And leap by leap, like some pale frost wraith, the snowshoe rabbit flashed on ahead.
Buck did not know of this, and as he rounded the bend, the frost wraith of a rabbit still flitting before him, he saw another and larger frost wraith leap from the overhanging bank into the immediate path of the rabbit.
Why, I may say, nothing of it, except, ah, according to your own reasoning, there is nothing to prevent your getting out, hitting the frost, so to speak, for a matter of ten miles.
The cold hoar frost glistened on the tombstones, and sparkled like rows of gems, among the stone carvings of the old church.
So, Gabriel Grub got on his feet as well as he could, for the pain in his back; and, brushing the frost off his coat, put it on, and turned his face towards the town.
Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, collards, turnips, spinach, lettuce, and swiss chard can all be harvested through mild frosts, and some can grow straight through the hard freezes of late fall and early winter.
Sometimes frosts come earlier than expected, regardless of the zone, sun exposure etc.
We here in the southern states have the advantage of extending our growing into several seasons by utilizing the warm autumn days and late frost dates.
The Frosts are well known throughout the community for their generous support of education and the arts.
The School will be named the Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music at the University of Miami.
Phillip Frost, chairman of the University's Board of Trustees and chair of Momentum: The Campaign for the University of Miami.