from head to toe

(redirected from from tip)

from head to toe

Encompassing one's entire body; from top to bottom. Typically refers to how one is dressed and groomed. This is a fancy event, so you need to look good from head to toe. Schedule a haircut and shine your shoes.
See also: head, toe

head to toe

Encompassing one's entire body; top to bottom. Typically refers to how one is dressed and groomed. This is a fancy event, so you need to look good from head to toe. Schedule a haircut and shine your shoes.
See also: head, toe

from head to toe

Fig. from the top of one's head to one's feet. She was decked out in flowers from head to toe. The huge parka covered the small child from head to toe, assuring that she would be well-protected against the cold.
See also: head, toe

from head to toe

Also, from head to heels or foot ; from tip or top to toe . Over the entire body, in its entirety. For example, He was dressed in black from head to toe, or She ached all over, from tip to toe. These expressions date from ancient times. The alliterative head to heels originated about 1400, and Shakespeare had "from top to toe" in Hamlet (1:2).
See also: head, toe

from head to toe

or

from head to foot

COMMON You use from head to toe or from head to foot to talk about the whole of someone's body. She was covered from head to toe with black and blue marks. She was trembling from head to foot. Note: You can also just say head to toe or head to foot. She was dressed head to toe in black. The boy is wrapped head to foot in a green blanket. Note: You can use head-to-toe or head-to-foot before a noun. He turned up clad in head-to-toe black. Standing against the wall was this man in head-to-foot leather. Compare with from top to toe.
See also: head, toe

from head to toe (or foot)

all over your body.
See also: head, toe

from ˌhead to ˈfoot/ˈtoe

all over your body; completely: She was dressed from head to foot in white.He was covered from head to foot in mud.
See also: foot, head, toe
References in periodicals archive ?
In exchange for an employer's or employee's participation, the IRS agrees to refrain from tip examination.
The IRS will try to increase the number of filings of Form 8027, Employer's Annual Information Return of Tip Income and Allocated Tips, as well as the percentage of tips reported by both employers and employees and the tax collections from tip income.
The strategy has three objectives: reduce nonfiling of Forms 8027, Employer's Annual Information Return of Tip Income and Allocated Tips; increase the percentage of tips reported by employers and employees; and increase tax collections from tip income.
The IRS states that lost tax revenue from tip income ranks second to the revenue lost on illegal activities.
For example, waiters, barbers, workers in housekeeping, toilet cleaners, and other service providers can earn twice or three times more from tips than wages.
(17) Moreover, federal and state laws ensure that total wages (including tips) meet or exceed the regular minimum wage for that jurisdiction, so income levels among low wage workers have more to do with the number of hours worked and with the minimum wage level than with whether that income comes from tips or paid wages.
Certain establishments will take a portion of the tip as a "transaction" fee (and many will deduct income tax from tips collected through card payments.
This is important because the tips paid to an employer (who then distributes them to the employee) may be subject to withholding requirements, and any deductions from tips for withholding will need to be itemized on the employee's pay stub.
(1) In addition, millions of workers in the United States derive most of their income from tips (Wessels 1997), and tipping is prevalent in numerous countries and occupations (Star 1988).
Pizza Express said that Guirguis was sacked for misrepresenting the company by claiming they profited from tips.
A substantial number of employees in the service sector earn a large proportion of their earnings from tips, including restaurant employees, valet parking attendants, hair salon workers, casino employees, and bartenders.
Fior operated a restaurant that employed waiters, bartenders and others whose earnings came in part from tips. It computed and paid its share of FICA taxes for each employee, based on each employee's salary and tip reports.
Like commissioned employees, the bulk of most tipped employees' wages comes from tips.