friends with (someone)

(redirected from friends with one)

friends with (someone)

Having an amicable relationship with someone; (being) a friend of someone. You're friends with Jane, right? How is she doing?
See also: friend
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*friends with someone

a friend of someone. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) Sally is friends with Bill. Mary and Bill are friends with one another.
See also: friend
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"Rule of life: you don't have to be a Tory in order to be friends with one. Even if they end up being Prime Minister" Actress Helena Bonham Carter on David Cameron "Marriage is like throwing yourself into a river when you only wanted a drink of water" Actor Sir David Jason "I have very firm views on Brexit and we appear to have shot ourselves in both feet.
Justice Azmat Saeed said in his remarks says, 'NAB would be friends with one accused and would arrest another one.
It is believed Mr Owen had been good friends with one of the 20 young people who are suspected to have killed themselves in Bridgend, south Wales, since the beginning of last year.
Eventually, he begins to learn his new trade, even making friends with one of the boys who works in the kitchens, and in time comes reason to hope for rescue.
Phoebe lives with a family which gives her many privileges and is friends with one charged in a plot of black slaves who set fire to buildings to start an uprising.
"The biggest impact on Thunder Bay is the professional (marine officers) and lower deck hands that lived here and liked to work for the Paterson's," says Johnson, who is friends with one shipmaster now out of work.
While on a trip home to Colombia, Rosenberg made friends with one of the bank's clients who had a strawberry farm on the side.
Moravians, a pietist sect from Germany, founded the town in the late eighteenth century as a "congregation community" where life was lived "within a framework of personal relationships between kin and friends with one set of values" and where "public and private spheres merge under church direction" (p.