friendly


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Officer Friendly

A police officer who is perceived as non-threatening due to his calm and amiable demeanor. Dale, I know you think aggression is the best way to get information, but you'd be surprised how easy it is to get people to talk to you when you're Officer Friendly. Stop yelling at me! I want Officer Friendly to do my interrogation!
See also: friendly, officer

be on good terms (with someone)

To have a friendly or pleasant relationship with someone. No, I'm on good terms with Stephanie now—we reconciled after that argument. You should always try to be on good terms with your boss. Anne and Paula had been fighting, but they're on good terms now.
See also: good, on, term

be on bad terms (with someone)

To be in a state of utter disagreement, dislike, or contempt with someone. My ex-husband and I wanted to part amicably, but ever since the divorce started, we have been on really bad terms. I'm on bad terms with Stephanie ever since that argument.
See also: bad, on, term

be on friendly terms with (someone)

To have a pleasant relationship with someone. I'm on friendly terms with Stephanie now—we reconciled after that argument. You should always try to be on friendly terms with your boss.
See also: friendly, on, term

user friendly

Fig. easy to use. (Hyphenated before nominals.) The set-up instructions for the printer were very user friendly. I have a user-friendly computer that listens to my voice and does what I tell it.
See also: friendly, user

be on good, bad, friendly, etc. ˈterms (with somebody)

have a good, bad, friendly, etc. relationship with somebody: He’s not on very good terms with his wife’s family.I’m on first-name terms with my boss now (= we call each other by our first names).
See also: on, term
References in periodicals archive ?
A friendly style helps to confirm with superiors and subordinates that they are worthy of being acknowledged.
All of the advantages associated with physician executives' being attentive, friendly, and relaxed and not contentious contribute to their being effective leaders (persuaders) in health care organizations.
Careful planning is necessary when a company incurs expenses to resist a hostile takeover while implementing a friendly acquisition.
Expenses of a friendly takeover that never happens, a situation not present in National Starch, should be deductible.
Moreover, as transactions become more involved, the distinction between defensive actions to fend off a hostile suitor-and actions to facilitate a friendly takeover becomes blurred.
THE CENTRAL TAX ISSUE is whether the costs of defending against a hostile takeover or facilitating a friendly acquisition are deductible.
Supreme Court upheld the lower court ruling that friendly takeover costs are not deductible for federal tax purposes.