friend

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friend

To add someone to one's network on a social media site. I just friended that cute girl from my English class.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And if friendlessness is a condition, it should remain constant in the life experience of individual middlers.
But one becomes well aware early on that the play's most engaging charater -- his supposed friendlessness, indeed, is hard to fathom -- is also the one treated least fully, as if Christopher's main function were to have points scored off him.
Whether motivated by unemployment or some other economic reversal, by illness or alcoholism, by social disgrace or an overwhelming sense of friendlessness, or simply by advancing decrepitude, the evidence of Victorian Hull bear out the contention of Durkheim's early follower, Maurice Halbwachs, that all suicide stems essentially from the victim's profound sense of social isolation, "a feeling of solitude which is definitive and without remedy" (pp.
L A Touch, whom one could have fancied but for her friendlessness in the market, won at those same odds.
Also, the effect will last only while the camper is with you; once he's back home, he's stuck with the same problem of friendlessness.
Families are broken, former ways forgotten, isolation, friendlessness, apathy and despair fill our hearts.
this macabre mirror-sharp everyday mall of getting and spending, where nothing is authentic nothing is worth knowing nothing is admissible, uncivil centre, aetiolation of friendlessness, glossy women from another climate made-up for combatting the elements as well as each other, people this place invites me to despise, barely veneered back-fangs of capital, you gangrenous Musgrave, severed from the life-line of trees .
The parallels to Stevens's personal life, however, are obvious even here: the friendlessness, the studied personal isolation, the denigration of family and personal to professional life, even the insistence on "working" vacations.
The name, the sights of Leavenworth, such as they were and are, had become in my absence mere proxies for misery: two miserable high school years of friendlessness and quiet, nameless dread.
(14) The girl-vagrant "feels homelessness and friendlessness more; she has more of the feminine dependence on affection; the street-trades, too, are harder for her, and the return at night to some lonely cellar or tenement-room, crowded with dirty people of all ages and sexes, is more dreary.