fresh out (of something)

fresh out (of something)

1. Having no stock of a certain item or product because the last one has just been sold or used. I'm sorry, but it looks like we're fresh out! People are going crazy for these little gizmos. They checked their inventory, but apparently they're fresh out of the blender that's on sale.
2. Having just completed a particular task or goal, often a level of education. This candidate is fresh out of college and has no teaching experience. I'm fresh out of swim practice, so I need to shower.
See also: fresh, out
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fresh out (of something)

 and clean out (of something)
just now having sold or used up the last of something. Sorry, I can't serve you scrambled eggs. We are fresh out of eggs. We are fresh out of nails. I sold the last box just ten minutes ago. Lettuce? Sorry. I'm clean out.
See also: fresh, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fresh out of

Also, clean out of. Recently or completely used up or unavailable. For example, Sorry, I'm fresh out of sugar and can't lend you any, or We're clean out of small change. [Colloquial; late 1800s]
See also: fresh, of, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fresh out of something

(informal, especially American English) having recently finished a supply of something: Sorry, we’re fresh out of milk.
See also: fresh, of, out, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

fresh out of

Recently or completely depleted. This American colloquialism from the late 1800s is generally used for a supply of something, as in “Sorry, we’re fresh out of that brand of cereal.”
See also: fresh, of, out
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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