freeze

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give (one) the freeze

To intentionally ignore, appear disinterested in, or act indifferent toward one; to snub one. She thinks you started that rumor about her—that's why she's been giving you the freeze all day. Everyone gave me the freeze from the moment I stepped foot inside the room.
See also: freeze, give
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

freeze

1. n. the act of ignoring someone; the cold shoulder. Everybody seems to be giving me the freeze.
2. tv. to ignore someone; to give someone the cold shoulder. Don’t freeze me, gang! I use a mouth wash!
3. in. to hold perfectly still. (Also a command given by a police officer that implies there is a gun pointed at a suspect.) The fuzz shouted, “Freeze, or you’re dead meat!”
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Lawmakers have (http://www.ibtimes.com/equifax-breach-senator-urges-company-offer-free-credit-freezes-2588609) pushed for credit reporting firms to allow consumers to freeze their account without paying, and have gone so far as to (https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/08/senate-banking-bill-would-make-credit-freezes-free.html) include a provision in a recent bill that would require credit freezes be made free.
Based on the lab and field evaluation, the freezing system developed herein can effectively freeze the targeted area.
State legislators around the country, are considering a "security freeze" on credit reports for consumers whose personal information has been exposed through security breaches.
Others have studied the effects of major weather systems such as El Nino on Florida crop freezes, but the simulations provide a first look at the consequences of local land-use changes, says Pielke.
Trees that initially leafed out and seemed to have survived the freeze were showing shriveled leaves and more dead branches by midsummer.
A classic estate freeze before the Revenue Act of 1987 typically involved recapitalization of a corporation with the business owner recasting most of his or her investment into preferred stock.
One phenomenon, called frost heave, is the expansion that occurs when wet, fine-grained soils freeze. If rocks are scattered throughout such soils, repeated episodes of freezing and thawing brings the stones to the surface because damp soil particles gradually flow around and settle under the stones.
And while reanimating entire bodies may be a stretch, Storey and others are striving to find methods to freeze and thaw pieces of individual cells, scraps of tissue, even organs like livers and hearts--because for transplant patients freezable organs could be lifesavers.
Without sufficient nuclei present at the equilibrium temperature of solidification, the molten iron will undercool before it starts to freeze.
The explanation of this unexpected shape, however, turned out to involve the angles between solid, liquid, and air at the interface where all three meet, which moves as the water freezes.
The water freezes onto the ice to create the ridge."
Survival seems to depend on how much body water freezes: Anything much above 54 percent appears lethal, the researchers say.
To avoid this damage, cryobiologists usually cool their samples slowly so that water has enough time to come out of cells before it freezes. They also add cryoprotective agents such as glycerol, which are thought to act as antifreeze solutions and which may protect cell parts by stabilizing membranes and proteins.
The discovery that glycopeptides change the way ice freezes provides some useful clues.
The researchers believe that the top of the rock freezes first and is pulled up by the inflated frozen soil.