free-range parenting

free-range parenting

A movement and/or method of parenting in which children are granted ample freedom with limited parental supervision, within boundaries considered appropriate by their parents. The movement is often seen as a reaction against laws, rules, and societal pressures mandating that children are supervised nearly at all times. We believe in free-range parenting, so once we think our kids are mature enough to handle the responsibility of walking to the park by themselves, we'll let them.
See also: parenting
References in periodicals archive ?
Writing in the Atlantic about a "free-range child" law proposed in Utah, Indiana University sociology professor Jessica McCrory Calarco argued, "What counts as 'free-range parenting' and what counts as 'neglect' are in the eye of the beholder--and race and class often figure heavily into such distinctions." (14) In a letter responding to the Atlantic story, Diane Redleaf, legal director of the National Center for Housing and Child Welfare in Chicago, wrote, "Neglect laws currently are sweeping in millions of poor and minority families under amorphous standards.
But free-range parenting also produced a "nobody loves me" mindset for many of my peers.
YOU NEED TO REMEMBER that half a century before the modish term "free-range parenting" was coined, most North American children were far freer to roam on their own-on foot, by bicycle, or via public transportation-than they are today.
We're seeing the growth of a free-range parenting movement, forest schools, and Nature education, all of which allow children to spend time in natural environments.
Britain is only an extreme example of the broader phenomenon that can see the world's greatest city, New York, shut down not by a snowstorm but by the possibility of a snowstorm; and the bizarre term"free-range parenting" applied to American moms and dads who believe their children should be allowed to walk home from school alone and play outside.
You might ask: "Who could help you back off?" Finding other parents to have as friends who are not so intense, who don't feel the need to have a perfect child, or who are willing to let their kids be more autonomous may be key Some websites and social networks developing to help parents back off from helicoptering promote "slow parenting," "free-range parenting," or "simplicity parenting."