free translation

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free translation

A restatement of something that lacks accuracy or nuance. Well, that's a rather free translation of what I said—I was not the slightest bit accusatory. Yes, but in Heather's free translation of the text, she missed some very salient points.
See also: free, translation
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

free translation

 and loose translation
a translation or restatement that is not completely accurate and not well thought out; a translation or restatement done casually. John gave a free translation of what our Japanese client asked for, and we missed the main issue. Anne gave a very free translation of the ancient Chinese poem.
See also: free, translation
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
[This is a very free translation of the Song of the Returning Hunter, as the men used to sing it after seal-spearing.
"Even your traditions make the case in my favor, Chingachgook," he said, speaking in the tongue which was known to all the natives who formerly inhabited the country between the Hudson and the Potomac, and of which we shall give a free translation for the benefit of the reader; endeavoring, at the same time, to preserve some of the peculiarities, both of the individual and of the language.
Tarish Al Mansouri, director general of Dubai Courts, said the new project will provide services including immediate free translations, dispute resolutions, implementation of judicial rulings, immigration services under General Directorate of Residency and Foreign Affairs (GDRFA) in addition to administrative support services.
A range of apps promises free translations that can be unreliable.
Machine translators provide fast and free translations, but they are not accurate.
In 2010, Clinical Chemistry created exclusive Chinese translations of the "Guide to Scientific Writing." These free translations are available on the Clinical Chemistry website.
Two authors examine the motives behind Spenser's free translations of Virgil's Gnat.
He argues for dynamically equivalent theology that maintains a balance in free translations of the Bible and formally equivalent, or literal translation, of the ancient languages.
"The service provides clients with alerts of potential infringements or copyists, it can be worldwide, regional or on a UK basis, it provides free translations of foreign applications and provides easy to read electronic notifications," said Ms Roome.
They're not free translations. We're conscious of the fact that the reader is getting a glimpse of a novel or a small selection of poems and we want them to come back for more.
Raffel, as mentioned, who argued extensively about Pound's theory of translation in The Art of Translating Poetry (1988) described his roughly equivalent, subjective type of translation as irrational, stubborn, and forceful translation, his "interpretive translation" (115-21) totally different from formal, imitative, and free translations. Pound's surprise is his own choice, and Caws is happy (surprised or not?) with Pounds' novel re-creation of Rimbaud (91).
His last collection, Horses in Boiling Blood (published posthumously) was based on free translations of the French poet Apollinaire.
Yao argues that Lowell's free translations in Imitations can be discussed as part of the Modernist inheritance in translation--central to his work, allowing the poet to develop his own concerns in a fruitful way, and not necessarily based on a good knowledge of the source language.
I wish that Terpening had utilized this fascinating theoretical framework in a more profound way throughout his discussion of Dolce's theater in order to hone the distinctions he makes among imitations, free translations, original works, and acts of plagiarism.
Does the Roman Curia have the right to tell Episcopal Conferences how to translate the Scriptures, to drop the excessively free translations, the bowing to political correctness, feminist interpretation, etc., or should this be left to the Episcopal Conferences concerned?