free as a bird


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(as) free as a bird

1. Unencumbered; not restrained by anything. The phrase means the same as "free," but with more emphasis. I'm as free as a bird this Friday! Do you want to meet for dinner? She's single now—free as a bird!
2. Happy and untroubled. Betty must be free as a bird because I never see her in a bad mood.
See also: bird, free

*free as a bird

 and *free as (the) air
Cliché carefree; completely free and unhindered. (*Also: as ~.) Jane is always happy and free as a bird. The convict escaped from jail and was as free as a bird for two days. No, I'm not married. I don't even have a girlfriend. I'm free as the air.
See also: bird, free

free as a bird

At liberty, without obligations, as in Can you join us tonight?-Yes, I'm free as a bird, or He's free as a bird-he can travel wherever he chooses. [c. 1700]. Also see footloose and fancy-free.
See also: bird, free

free as a bird

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

free as the air

BRITISH
If someone is free as a bird or free as the air, they are completely free and have no worries or troubles. I have been island-hopping in the Pacific for the past two and a half years, free as a bird. They think of us as favoured beings, going where we like, working when we feel like it, free as the air. Note: You can also say that someone is free as air. Our children play around in the August heatwaves, free as air and enjoying independence.
See also: bird, free

(as) free as (the) ˈair/as a ˈbird

completely free: You can’t imagine what it’s like to feel as free as the air. Nobody who hasn’t been in prison can imagine it.
See also: air, bird, free

free as a bird

Totally at liberty. Being able to fly about at will has long seemed to be the epitome of freedom. The simile here dates back at least to the seventeenth century, when “as free as a bird in ayre” appeared in the Somers Tracts (1635).
See also: bird, free