fraught with danger/peril

fraught with danger/peril

Very risky indeed. Fraught with means “full of ” and is rarely used today except in the sense of something undesirable. The expression, a cliché since the nineteenth century, first appeared in print in 1576 as “fraught with difficulties”; the precise cliché was first cited by the OED as appearing in 1864 in H. Ainsworth’s Tower of London: “This measure . . . is fraught with danger.”
See also: danger, fraught, peril