frame (one)

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frame (one)

To manipulate a situation so that an innocent person appears to have committed a crime (so that the actual criminal can avoid blame or detection). A: "They're framing me, officer, I swear! I would never go to a seedy place like that!" B: "Oh yeah? Then why did we find your fingerprints there?"
See also: frame
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

frame

1. tv. to cause an innocent person to be blamed for a crime; to contrive evidence so that someone appears to be guilty. (Originally underworld.) Jimmy tried to frame his sister for painting the cat yellow.
2. and frame-up and frameup n. a scheme where an innocent person is made to take the blame for something; incrimination caused by contrived evidence. (Underworld.) The frame-up would have worked if it weren’t for one little thing.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Carl Beech, known by the pseudonym Nick, hid his sexual interest in young boys behind a secret app on his iPad, tried to frame someone else, and only later admitted a series of charges, jurors were told.
Beech was prosecuted and tried to frame someone else until he pleaded guilty, after a jury had been sworn in, Mr Badenoch said.
When asked by Mr Hall if he believed being a 'nuisance' warranted reason to frame someone for murder, Mr Patrick replied: "I don't know why they framed me for a murder I have not committed." ?
The service also included the option to frame someone else by name for the threat for an additional $15 surcharge-though Kadar recommended against framing someone in one of the supposed advertisements he posted.
In the light of his lies and his attempts to frame someone else for the crime, the six years and 11 months he has been sentenced to is too lenient.
Of course, there's also a suicide and the unmasking of a plan to frame someone for murder.
Jonathan Rauch, author of Kindly Inquisitors: The New Attacks on Free Thought, adds, "What the right has figured out is that if you can frame someone as a special pleader, a special interest in America, that person is rightly in trouble." It is the very potency of the "special rights" charge that has forced a subtle shift in political strategy--at least at the rhetorical level--away from the victim model that other groups have embraced.
Of course, it can't be all fun and games - what's Christmas without a suicide and the unmasking of a plan to frame someone for murder?