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crazy like a fox

Very clever, cunning, or shrewd while appearing foolish or mad. People thought I was crazy when I told them my idea for massive social networking site—crazy like a fox, more like it! Our boss is crazy like a fox; her daredevil schemes always sound like they'll bankrupt us, but they invariably bring in a huge profit.
See also: crazy, fox, like

Don't let the fox guard the henhouse.

Don't assign the duty of protecting or controlling valuable information or resources to someone who is likely to exploit that opportunity. You're going to put your ex-convict brother-in-law in charge of your business? I can't tell you how to run your company, but don't let the fox guard the henhouse.
See also: fox, guard, let

fox guarding the henhouse

A person likely to exploit the information or resources that they have been charged to protect or control. My sister is going to put her ex-convict brother-in-law in charge of her business, and I'm worried he'll be like a fox guarding the henhouse.
See also: fox, guard, henhouse

fox in the henhouse

Someone with bad intentions. (A fox would prey upon hens in a henhouse.) I'd watch out for him if I were you—he walks around here like a fox in the henhouse.
See also: fox, henhouse

fox's sleep

A state of apparent sleep (or feigned indifference) in which someone is actually aware of everything going on around him or her. Alludes to the idea that foxes sleep with one eye open and thus are always at the ready. I think Amy is just in a fox's sleep, so be careful what you say right now. The best way to get gossip on these trips is to be in a fox's sleep.
See also: sleep

shoot (one's) fox

To undermine or thwart someone's plans, efforts, or ambitions by taking action that pre-empts them or makes them redundant. Primarily heard in UK. Congress may have shot the president's fox, though, with a bill that he cannot politically afford to veto, but which leaves him with no opportunity to pass his signature healthcare plan.
See also: fox, shoot

*sly as a fox

 and *cunning as a fox
Cliché smart and clever. (*Also: as ~.) My nephew is as sly as a fox. You have to be cunning as a fox to outwit me.
See also: fox, sly

crazy like a fox

Seemingly foolish but actually very shrewd and cunning. For example, You think Bob was crazy to turn it down? He's crazy like a fox, because they've now doubled their offer . This usage gained currency when humorist S.J. Perelman used it as the title of a book (1944). [Early 1900s] .
See also: crazy, fox, like

crazy like a fox

AMERICAN, INFORMAL
If you describe someone as crazy like a fox, you mean that they seem strange or silly but may in fact be acting in a clever way. He can be as scary in person as he is on screen — that man is crazy like a fox. Note: The image here is of the fox that is traditionally seen as clever and able to trick people.
See also: crazy, fox, like

crazy like a fox

very cunning or shrewd.
See also: crazy, fox, like

shoot someone's fox

thwart someone's plans or ambitions by pre-empting them.
The expression comes from the world of fox-hunting, where shooting a fox, which robs the hunters of their sport, is viewed with great displeasure.
2004 Scotland on Sunday The Democrats had planned to make unemployment a key issue in their campaign: Dubya, with his tax cuts, has shot their fox.
See also: fox, shoot

fox

n. an attractive girl or young woman. Man, who was that fox I saw you with?

fox trap

n. an automobile customized and fixed up in a way that will attract women. I put every cent I earned into my fox trap, but I still repelled women.
See also: fox, trap

a stone cold fox

n. a very fine and sexy woman. (see also fox.) That dame is a stone cold fox. What’s her phone number?
See also: cold, fox, stone

stone fox

n. an attractive woman; a very sexy woman. Who is that stone fox I saw you with last night?
See also: fox, stone
References in periodicals archive ?
Urban settings, which provide plentiful food sources, are well-suited to sustain high population densities of foxes (34), who tend to have small home ranges and low dispersing distances (35,36).
Dispersing and transient foxes can always contaminate baited areas, even in much larger areas.
We demonstrated the feasibility of small-scale anthelmintic baiting of foxes to reduce E.
Home ranges, movements and habitat associations of red foxes Vulpes vulpes in suburban Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Preliminary study of the role of red foxes in Echinococcus multilocularis transmission in the urban area of Sapporo, Japan.
High prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in urban red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and voles (Arvicola terrestris) in the city of Zurich, Switzerland.
Chemotherapy with praziquantel has file potential to reduce the prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in wild foxes (Vulpes vulpes).
Potential remedy against Echinococcus multilocularis in wild red foxes using baits with anthelmintic distributed around fox breeding dens in Hokkaido, Japan.
Detection of Echinococcus multilocularis in foxes in The Netherlands.