like cheese at four pence

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like cheese at four pence

In an idle, awkward, and/or out-of-place state; being ignored, abandoned, or left to wait awkwardly. Primarily heard in UK. Well, don't just sit there like cheese at four pence—speak up and say what's on your mind! The receptionist was called away before I was done telling her what I needed, leaving me standing there like cheese at four pence.
See also: cheese, four, like, pence
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a fourpence, threepence, twopence and onepence piece and I still have them today.
In 1837 the pay of a Sergeant-Major was increased to three shillings a day and the Colour Sergeant received two shillings and fourpence.
The supermarkets used to charge fourpence less for a litre of unleaded, but the gap has been steadily eroded to less than half a penny.
Janet's father did not give her fourpence for chewing gum: she took it from his pocket.
That was the day when unrestricted crowds descended on stores with all the panache of a Mongol horde in an attempt to buy a 52ins television for fourpence.
We were all members of the National Cyclists Union and wherever you went there would be hotels and cafes where you could get a cup of tea for fourpence," said George, who was 89 when originally speaking in 2002.
Re-adopt the Groat - the Scottish coin originally worth fourpence, later worth eightpence and one shilling as inflation increased.
The usual assortment of owners, trainers, jockeys and stable staff, sure, and it's hats off to that, if racing for fourpence ha'penny, a bag of carrots (optional) and mild frostbite can be filed under 'benefit'.
It was a bit of 'send reinforcements we're going to advance' changing to 'send three and fourpence we're going to a dance'.
Years ago you could slip ashore in Cornwall for a night of lethal scrumpy, about fourpence a pint, so full of bits of apple you didn't drink it - you chewed it.
6 DANGER FOURPENCE FUNNIEST when said in a Ron Atkinson style, "It's Danger Here.
Incidentally the train ride to town was then, I think, fourpence, and twopence for me, and a similar amount by train from Stratford Station.