forked


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Related to forked: forkiest
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fork off

1. To split and continue on in a different direction. The road's going to fork off to the right in a couple of miles, which will lead you to our cabin. Several people in the group forked off to explore the other side of the mansion.
2. A humorous euphemism for "fuck off," an otherwise very rude and aggressive way to tell someone to go away. Fork off, will you? I don't want to hear any more of your ridiculous conspiracy theories. A: "Did you actually think your singing sounded good there?" B: "Oh, just fork off."
See also: fork, off

fork out

1. To distribute food with a fork. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fork" and "out." One of the caterers carved the meat and then forked it out for waiting guests.
2. To give or dispense something, often money. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "fork" and "out." If you want the most cutting edge technology, you'd better be prepared to fork out the dough for it.
3. To split off or move away from something else, as of a body of water. That part of the river forks out from where we're standing now.
See also: fork, out

fork over

To physically give someone something, often reluctantly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fork" and "over." If you want the most cutting edge technology, you'd better be prepared to fork over the dough for it. Fork over your lunch money, dweeb.
See also: fork, over

fork the fingers

To give a rude gesture with one's hand. This phrase is rarely heard today. I told you, it was an honest mistake, so don't fork the fingers at me!
See also: finger, fork

forked tongue

A trait of someone who speaks in a dishonest or deceitful manner. Often used in the phrase "speak with (a) forked tongue." I wouldn't trust a thing Caitlin says, she's always speaking with a forked tongue.
See also: forked, tongue

have a forked tongue

To make empty or false promises; to speak duplicitously or beguilingly. Likened to having the tongue of a serpent, a traditional symbol of deceit and dishonesty. That's the last time I lend Brian any money, that guy has a forked tongue! He learned quickly that having a forked tongue was an effective way of getting ahead in business.
See also: forked, have, tongue

speak with a forked tongue

To make empty or false promises; to speak duplicitously or beguilingly. Likened to having the tongue of a serpent, a traditional symbol of deceit and dishonesty. It's becoming increasingly obvious that the senator spoke with a forked tongue during his campaign. He learned quickly that speaking with a forked tongue was an effective way of getting ahead in business.
See also: forked, speak, tongue

with (a) forked tongue

Duplicitously or beguilingly; untruthfully. It's becoming increasingly obvious that the president-elect spoke with forked tongue during his campaign. He learned quickly that speaking with a forked tongue was an effective way of getting ahead in business.
See also: forked, tongue
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fork something out

 (to someone)
1. Inf. Lit. to serve food to someone, using a fork. He forked out the chicken to everyone. He brought up a big dish of fried chicken and forked it out.
2. Fig. to give out something to someone. We forked the coupons out to everyone who asked for them. We forked out the coupons.
See also: fork, out

fork something over (to someone)

Inf. to give something to someone. (Usually refers to money.) Come on! Fork the money over to me! Fork over the cash you owe me!
See also: fork, over

speak with a forked tongue

Fig. to tell lies; to try to deceive someone. Jean's mother sounds very charming, but she speaks with a forked tongue. People tend to believe Fred because he seems plausible, but we know he speaks with a forked tongue.
See also: forked, speak, tongue
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fork over

Also, fork out or up . Hand over, pay up. For example, It's time you forked over what you owe, or He forked out a hundred for that meal, or Fork up or we'll sue. [Slang; early 1800s]
See also: fork, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

speak with forked tongue

or

speak with a forked tongue

If someone speaks with forked tongue or speaks with a forked tongue, they are lying or trying to trick people. He speaks with forked tongue. I don't trust him and I don't like him. This shows that the minister has been speaking with a forked tongue. Note: People sometimes use talk instead of speak. Everybody in this business is talking with forked tongue.
See also: forked, speak, tongue
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

with forked tongue

untruthfully or deceitfully. humorous
The image is of the forked tongue of a snake, snakes being traditional symbols of treachery and deceit.
2002 New York Times Orpheus members have long spoken with forked tongues about conductors. They…make sweeping generalizations about them.
See also: forked, tongue
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

fork out

v.
1. To distribute or supply something, especially money: The government forks out millions of dollars to maintain the royal palace. The town finally forked the cash out for a new high school.
2. To split or diverge; fork: The river forks out in numerous places in the delta.
See also: fork, out

fork over

or fork up
v.
To give or transfer something, especially in a reluctant, unenthusiastic, or automatic way: I thought the rug was overpriced, but I forked the cash over. We forked over our admission tickets to the usher and walked into the theater.
See also: fork, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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