fork over, to

fork over

To physically give someone something, often reluctantly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "fork" and "over." If you want the most cutting edge technology, you'd better be prepared to fork over the dough for it. Fork over your lunch money, dweeb.
See also: fork, over
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

fork something over (to someone)

Inf. to give something to someone. (Usually refers to money.) Come on! Fork the money over to me! Fork over the cash you owe me!
See also: fork, over
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fork over

Also, fork out or up . Hand over, pay up. For example, It's time you forked over what you owe, or He forked out a hundred for that meal, or Fork up or we'll sue. [Slang; early 1800s]
See also: fork, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fork over

or fork up
v.
To give or transfer something, especially in a reluctant, unenthusiastic, or automatic way: I thought the rug was overpriced, but I forked the cash over. We forked over our admission tickets to the usher and walked into the theater.
See also: fork, over
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fork over, to

To pay up, to hand over. This slangy term probably comes from the verb “to fork,” underground slang for picking someone’s pocket using only two fingers (resembling a two-tined fork). Dating from the first half of the 1800s, the term occasionally alluded to turning over something other than money, but it is the monetary version that survived. It also is put as an imperative, “Fork it over!” According to an article in Fortune by Rob Norton, it is one of the many clichés particularly favored by business journalists (Jan. 13, 1997).
See also: fork
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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