forgive

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(one) could be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable that one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this country could be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You could be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes for the last five years.
See also: could, forgive

(one) might be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable that one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this country might be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You might be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes for the last five years.
See also: forgive, might

(one) will be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable that one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this country will be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You'll be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes for the last five years.
See also: forgive, will

(one) would be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable that one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this country would be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You would be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes for the last five years.
See also: forgive

forgive (someone) for (something)

To absolve or pardon someone for a misdeed or slight. I don't think she'll ever be able to forgive Jack for cheating on her. Please forgive me, I have the worst memory—what's your name again?
See also: forgive

forgive and forget

To forgive someone and (attempt to) forget that the wrong they committed ever happened. I really do want to move on, but I just can't forgive and forget that you tried to steal my boyfriend!
See also: and, forget, forgive

God forgive me

A phrase commonly said in conjunction with a rude or otherwise unkind or inappropriate statement. God forgive me, but Lois is just so exhausting to deal with.
See also: forgive, god

to err is human (to forgive is divine)

Being fallible and making mistakes is inherent to being a human, and forgiving such mistakes is a transcendent act. I know you're mad at your brother because he lied, but to err is human, you know. To forgive is divine.
See also: err, forgive, human

Forgive and forget.

Prov. You should not only forgive people for hurting you, you should also forget that they ever hurt you. When my sister lost my favorite book, I was angry at her for weeks, but my mother finally convinced me to forgive and forget. Jane: Are you going to invite Sam to your party? Sue: No way. Last year he laughed at my new skirt. Jane: Come on, Sue, forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

forgive someone for something

to pardon someone for something. Please forgive me for being late. He never forgave himself for harming her.
See also: forgive

forgive and forget

Both pardon and hold no resentment concerning a past event. For example, After Meg and Mary decided to forgive and forget their differences, they became good friends . This phrase dates from the 1300s and was a proverb by the mid-1500s. For a synonym, see let bygones be bygones.
See also: and, forget, forgive

to err is human, to forgive divine

it is human nature to make mistakes yourself while finding it hard to forgive others. proverb
See also: divine, err, forgive

forˌgive and forˈget

decide to forget an argument, an insult, etc: Come on, it’s time to forgive and forget.Many of his victims find it impossible to forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

he, she, etc. could/might be forgiven for doing something

used to say that it is easy to understand why somebody does or thinks something, although they are wrong: Looking at the crowds out shopping, you could be forgiven for thinking that everyone has plenty of money to spend.

forgive and forget

Both pardon and dismiss someone’s mistake, rudeness, or other transgression. This expression has been an English proverb since at least the thirteenth century. William Langland in Piers Ploughman held it up as a form of Christian charity to be practiced by all: “So will Cryst of his curteisye, and men crye hym mercy, bothe forgive and forgeter.” It appears in John Heywood’s 1546 collection of proverbs and was used by Shakespeare in at least four of his plays, including King Lear (4.7): “Pray you now, forget and forgive; I am old and foolish.” It remains current to the present day.
See also: and, forget, forgive
References in periodicals archive ?
When forgiving seems too generous but you recognize you must move on, Spring suggests taking these steps:
As modern forgiveness research evolves, the findings clearly show that forgiving transforms people mentally, emotionally, spiritually, and even physically.
It shows that parents find it easier to forgive than their children, and that women are better at forgiving than men.
Forgiving As We've Been Forgiven is a thoughtful biblical roadmap for anyone dealing with seemingly insurmountable past issues, such as divorce, abuse, or rejection.
Often the greatest challenge is forgiving yourself, says the retired minister, who returned to his native England in 2005 to work as a spiritual director and retreat host.
Cosgrove and Konstam (2008) also stated that forgiving allows the relationship to continue.
The author's view is that an anthropology that states that man has only self-regarding desires can never resolve this paradox and make sense of prototypical forgiving. Positively, the paper argues that the paradox disappears, if human nature is ascribed (as, for instance, by Hume) basic other-regarding desires of benevolence.
Whether it's over an atrocity or minor oversight, forgiving can be difficult, explains Pamela Everett Thompson, a clinical psychologist and professional life coach with the Novem Group, a coaching firm in Atlanta.
Written for young readers age four to eight, Am I Forgiving? is a children's picturebook about the Christian value of forgiveness.
THANK God for Paul McCartney being the forgiving man he is.
Hence, many outside the profession have criticized the current economic paradigm as one bereft of possibilities for behaving charitably, considering issues of calling, pursuing vocation, loving genuinely, or forgiving without expecting something in return.
Can you see that far from being a wimp, your forgiving this person would mean that you have accomplished a change that takes great courage, compassion, and understanding--one that only a few human beings are capable of?
Rather than blasting our planet out of the solar system and starting again on kinder, gentler shores, God has decided that forgiving sin is better than making us pay for it.
But by controlling anger and forgiving the wrongdoer one can create a peaceful environment.