forgive

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to err is human (to forgive is divine)

Being fallible and making mistakes is inherent to being a human, and forgiving such mistakes is a transcendent act. I know you're mad at your brother because he lied, but to err is human, you know. To forgive is divine.
See also: err, forgive, human

forgive and forget

To forgive someone and (attempt to) forget that the wrong they committed ever happened. I really do want to move on, but I just can't forgive and forget that you tried to steal my boyfriend!
See also: and, forget, forgive

(one) will be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable why one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this ultra-conservative country will be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You'll be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes in over five years.
See also: forgive, will

(one) might be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable why one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this ultra-conservative country might be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You might be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes in over five years.
See also: forgive, might

(one) would be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable why one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this ultra-conservative country would be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You would be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes in over five years.
See also: forgive

(one) could be forgiven for (doing something)

It is completely understandable why one would do, think, or believe something, even if it is incorrect. Anyone visiting this ultra-conservative country could be forgiven for thinking that they've somehow gone backwards in time. You could be forgiven for wondering how a multinational company has failed to pay its taxes in over five years.
See also: could, forgive

Forgive and forget.

Prov. You should not only forgive people for hurting you, you should also forget that they ever hurt you. When my sister lost my favorite book, I was angry at her for weeks, but my mother finally convinced me to forgive and forget. Jane: Are you going to invite Sam to your party? Sue: No way. Last year he laughed at my new skirt. Jane: Come on, Sue, forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

forgive someone for something

to pardon someone for something. Please forgive me for being late. He never forgave himself for harming her.
See also: forgive

forgive and forget

Both pardon and hold no resentment concerning a past event. For example, After Meg and Mary decided to forgive and forget their differences, they became good friends . This phrase dates from the 1300s and was a proverb by the mid-1500s. For a synonym, see let bygones be bygones.
See also: and, forget, forgive

to err is human, to forgive divine

it is human nature to make mistakes yourself while finding it hard to forgive others. proverb
See also: divine, err, forgive

forˌgive and forˈget

decide to forget an argument, an insult, etc: Come on, it’s time to forgive and forget.Many of his victims find it impossible to forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

he, she, etc. could/might be forgiven for doing something

used to say that it is easy to understand why somebody does or thinks something, although they are wrong: Looking at the crowds out shopping, you could be forgiven for thinking that everyone has plenty of money to spend.
References in periodicals archive ?
The forgiver may decide that past wrongdoing need not permanently shape relations between victim and wrongdoer.
15) However, beyond freeing the forgiver, the process
To consider that the nature of forgiveness consists in its healing effects on the forgiver overlooks the distinction between the nature of forgiveness and the question about its desirable effects.
In other words, forgiveness, properly understood, occurs from a position of strength, not weakness, because the forgiver recognizes an injustice and labels it for what it is.
Her writing shows travel as healer, travel as mourning companion and travel as forgiver.
The emphasis is, first, on the "little hope" that precipitated Mary Magdalen's visit to the tomb, although "She could not know of life beyond our scope / Would raise him up"; then on the liberating effects of her recognition of "Her Lord and great forgiver," and on his injunction "not to touch him"; and finally on how "This huge event/ Lit Nature up" by rebutting the supposed finality of death and affirming the triumph of life (New Collected Poems 242).
However, with time, patience, and the guidance of a Master Forgiver, we are able to grow in our abilities to forgive others as we ourselves have been forgiven.
Volf writes of God the giver and forgiver, asking how should we give and forgive?
1) The diminishment or elimination of punishment--assigned by convention, statute law, or judicial procedure--enhances the majesty of the forgiver.
Besides committing to life together in peace with justice, forgiveness challenges and empowers both the forgiver and the forgiven to engage together in the common task to create a hopeful future by liberating themselves from the bitterness of the past.
God seeks forgiveness of the Forgiver for the murder of Quiz, whom He smote in a fit of annoyance when that man interrupted a concert by the high-school band with his complaints about the talkative ghost who's inhabiting his grounds.
In response to Remy's view, "The history of mankind is a history of horrors," she considers God a necessary forgiver.
Forgiveness has a truer and deeper meaning that should be treasured by both the person asking for forgiveness and the forgiver.
Even Flaubert's pregnant silences reinforce the concept of Felicite as a perpetual forgiver of others.