it's better to ask forgiveness than permission

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it's better to ask forgiveness than permission

It is better to act and do something that one may have to apologize for than to do nothing out of caution or politeness. The phrase prioritizes action over courtesy. I hope my supervisor isn't mad, but it's better to ask forgiveness than permission, right? Who cares if you offend someone—you need to get your music to the right people, and it's better to ask forgiveness than permission!
See also: ask, better
References in periodicals archive ?
In disqualification cases, forgiveness is sought through curse words,' Justice Saeed remarked in reply to the lawyer's argument.
Support can be found through meditation workshops, such as those offered by Diana Winston at UCLA, or through counselors who specialize in forgiveness therapy.
workforce is employed in some form of public service, and many may be eligible for loan forgiveness under this program.
The authors discuss their moral theme in the overview chapter and suggest forgiveness therapy is not a good fit with treatment approaches that exclude notions of right and wrong or justice and mercy.
Forgiveness is defined as the reduction of negative thoughts, cognitions, emotions, and motivations towards an offender (Exline, Worthington, Hill, & McCullough, 2003).
Researchers have found that forgiveness is beneficial psychologically (Al-Mabuk, Enright, & Cardis, 1995; Day et al.
The practice of forgiveness has been shown to reduce anger, hurt, depression and stress.
In other words, how does forgiveness occur without merely becoming a misnomer for an event that in reality is another act of self-interested calculation?
Self-forgiveness: The stepchild of forgiveness research.
The first thing we need to understand is that forgiveness is a challenging process.
And, at least in this paper, we will begin our journey with the question of forgiveness and whether it is indeed possible.
Tutu that forgiveness is key to freeing ourselves from the pain of past hurts ("Why We Forgive," Mar/Apr 2014), I find that far too often people confuse forgiveness with reconciliation.
The results indicated that majority of the participants knew the importance of forgiveness and that practice of forgiveness in daily life had resulted in several significant positive effects on their personality which contributed to their subjective wellbeing and this had enhanced their quality of life.
Now Colin Tipping, creator of Radical Forgiveness, has created a new Radical Grieving Online Program focused on bringing relief.
The disposition to seek forgiveness has recently been examined (Basset, Basset, Lloyd, & Johnson, 2006; Chiaramello, Munoz Sastre, & Mullet, 2008), and a three-factor structure has been found, which closely paralleled similar factors that have been found regarding the willingness to grant forgiveness, also called forgivingness (Roberts, 1995).