forget

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Related to forgetting: motivated forgetting

an elephant never forgets

One remembers everything. A play on the idea that elephants have great memories. I don't think we can pick up where we were before you betrayed me because an elephant never forgets! I would be hesitant to cross him—he's a dangerous man, and an elephant never forgets.
See also: elephant, forget, never

don't forget to write

A clichéd farewell urging someone to remain in contact while they are gone. Sometimes used humorously as a casual farewell. Have a wonderful time in Paris, Colin! Don't forget to write! A: "I'd better get going, thanks for having me!" B: "No problem. Don't forget to write!"
See also: forget, write

forget (about) it

1. To not expect something to work or happen. Often used as an imperative. If it's a pay raise you're looking for, you can just forget about it. Forget it, there's no way we could get up there without better equipment.
2. Never mind; I am not going to explain further. Forget about it. I don't want to talk about it. You know what, just forget it. I'm sorry I ever mentioned it.
3. Don't mention it; it was nothing. A response to someone thanking one. A: "Thank you again for your help yesterday." B: "Forget it, I was happy to lend a hand."
4. Don't worry about it; don't consider it a problem. You're still thinking about that? I told you I'm over it. Forget about it.
5. An expression used to indicate that what has just been mentioned is superlative or extreme, and perhaps cannot be put into words. Their wedding ceremony was already a bit weird, but the reception? Forget about it! They were good last year, but with the new draft pick? Forget about it!
See also: forget

forget (one's) manners

To act in a rude, impolite, or otherwise inappropriate way. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to reach across the table like that—I must have forgotten my manners for a minute there. How could you say something like that to me? Have you forgotten your manners?
See also: forget, manner

forget (oneself)

To behave in an impolite or unrestrained manner. Sure, sometimes I forget myself and snap at the kids, but doesn't every mother?
See also: forget

forget about (someone or something)

1. To not think about, fail to remember, or disregard someone or something. Don't forget about us after you've become a big shot out in LA! This traffic jam is awful! I forgot about the work they were doing to the road. Forget about snowshoes, you'd need a snowmobile to get up to that part of the mountain.
2. To not expect someone or something to work, happen, or do something. The roads are so narrow in this neighborhood—forget about driving your big truck in here! Forget about Sarah, she couldn't lead the team if her life depended on it.
See also: forget

forget you

slang A forceful expression of anger, dismissal, or contempt directed at someone. Can be used as a euphemism for "fuck you," meaning the same. I'm not cleaning up your mess! Forget you! A: "Did you actually think your singing sounded good there?" B: "Oh, forget you." I have every right to be here, so forget you!
See also: forget

forgive and forget

To forgive someone and (attempt to) forget that the wrong they committed ever happened. I really do want to move on, but I just can't forgive and forget that you tried to steal my boyfriend!
See also: and, forget, forgive

not forgetting (someone or something)

Including; as well as; last but not least. And finally, not forgetting our stalwart IT department—there's no way we would have been so successful this year without their incredible work. So in the morning, you'll need to open the blinds, water the plants, and feed the dog. Oh, and not forgetting the heating system, which you'll need to turn off the night before.
See also: forget, not

remember to write

A clichéd farewell urging someone to remain in contact while they are gone. Sometimes used humorously as a casual farewell. Have a wonderful time in Paris, Colin! Remember to write! A: "I'd better get going, thanks for having me!" B: "No problem. Remember to write!"
See also: remember, write

Forget (about) it!

 
1. Inf. Drop the subject!; Never mind!; Don't bother me with it. Jane: Then, there's this matter of the unpaid bills. Bill: Forget it! You'll have to pay them all! Sally: What's this I hear about you and Tom? Sue: Forget about it! I don't want to talk to you about it.
2. Inf. Nothing. Sue: What did you say? Mary: Forget it! Tom: Now I'm ready to go. Sue: Excuse me? Tom: Oh, nothing. Just forget it.
3. Inf. You're welcome.; It was nothing. John: Thank you so much for helping me! Bill: Oh, forget it!' Bob: We're all very grateful to you for coming into work today on your day off. Mary: Forget about it! No problem!
See also: forget

forget about someone or something

 
1. to put someone or something out of one's mind. Don't forget about me! You ought to forget about all that.
2. to fail to remember something at the appropriate time. She forgot about paying the electric bill until the lights were turned off. She forgot about the children and they were left standing on the corner.
See also: forget

forget one's manners

to do something ill-mannered. Jimmy! Have we forgotten our manners?
See also: forget, manner

forget oneself

to forget one's manners or training. (Said in formal situations in reference to belching, bad table manners, and, in the case of very young children, pants-wetting.) Sorry, Mother, I forgot myself. John, we are going out to dinner tonight. Please don't forget yourself.
See also: forget

Forget you!

Sl. Drop dead!; Beat it! Oh, yeah! Forget you! Forget you! Get a life!
See also: forget

Forgive and forget.

Prov. You should not only forgive people for hurting you, you should also forget that they ever hurt you. When my sister lost my favorite book, I was angry at her for weeks, but my mother finally convinced me to forgive and forget. Jane: Are you going to invite Sam to your party? Sue: No way. Last year he laughed at my new skirt. Jane: Come on, Sue, forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

Remember to write,

 and Don't forget to write. 
1. Lit. a final parting comment made to remind someone going on a journey to write to those remaining at home. Alice: Bye. Mary: Good-bye, Alice. Remember to write. Alice: I will. Bye. Sally: Remember to write! Fred: I will!
2. Fig. a parting comment made to someone in place of a regular good-bye. (Jocular.) John: See you tomorrow. Bye. Jane: See you. Remember to write. John: Okay. See you after lunch. Jane: Yeah. Bye. Remember to write.
See also: remember, write

forget it

Overlook it, it's not important; you're quite mistaken. This colloquial imperative is used in a variety of ways. For example, in Thanks so much for helping-Forget it, it was nothing, it is a substitute for "don't mention it" or you're welcome; in Stop counting the change-forget it! it means "stop doing something unimportant" in You think assembling this swingset was easy-forget it! it means "it was not at all easy"; and in Forget it-you'll never understand this theorem it means that the possibility of your understanding it is hopeless. [c. 1900]
See also: forget

forget oneself

Lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint; do or say something out of keeping with one's position or character. For example, A teacher should never forget herself and shout at the class. Shakespeare used it in Richard II (3:2): "I had forgot myself: am I not king?" [Late 1500s]
See also: forget

forgive and forget

Both pardon and hold no resentment concerning a past event. For example, After Meg and Mary decided to forgive and forget their differences, they became good friends . This phrase dates from the 1300s and was a proverb by the mid-1500s. For a synonym, see let bygones be bygones.
See also: and, forget, forgive

forˈget it

(spoken)
1 used to tell somebody that something is not important and that they should not worry about it: ‘I still owe you for lunch yesterday.’ ‘Forget it — it was my treat!’
2 used to tell somebody that you are not going to repeat what you said: ‘Now, what were you saying about John?’ ‘Forget it, it doesn’t matter.’
3 used to emphasize that you are saying ‘no’ to something: ‘Any chance of you helping out here?’ ‘Forget it, I’ve got too much to do.’
4 used to tell somebody to stop talking about something because they are annoying you: Just forget it, will you?
See also: forget

not forgetting...

(British English) used to include something in the list of things that you have just mentioned: I share the house with Jim, Ian and Sam, not forgetting Spike, the dog.
See also: not

forˌgive and forˈget

decide to forget an argument, an insult, etc: Come on, it’s time to forgive and forget.Many of his victims find it impossible to forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

Forget it!

1. exclam. Never mind, it wasn’t important! I had an objection, but just forget it!
2. exclam. Never mind, it was no trouble at all! No trouble at all. Forget it!
See also: forget

Forget you!

exclam. Drop dead!; Beat it! (Possibly euphemistic for Fuck you!) Forget you! Get a life!
See also: forget

forget (oneself)

To lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint.

forget it

Overlook it, disregard it. This colloquial imperative, dating from about 1900, is used in several ways. It can mean the same as “don’t mention it” or “you’re welcome,” as in, “‘Thanks for picking me up.’ ‘Forget it, it was no trouble.’” It also can mean “it won’t happen” or “it’s impossible,” as in “Find a parking space near the theater? Forget it!” These same meanings can be conveyed by forget about it, which, however, also may mean not to recall something and is not a cliché.
See also: forget

forgive and forget

Both pardon and dismiss someone’s mistake, rudeness, or other transgression. This expression has been an English proverb since at least the thirteenth century. William Langland in Piers Ploughman held it up as a form of Christian charity to be practiced by all: “So will Cryst of his curteisye, and men crye hym mercy, bothe forgive and forgeter.” It appears in John Heywood’s 1546 collection of proverbs and was used by Shakespeare in at least four of his plays, including King Lear (4.7): “Pray you now, forget and forgive; I am old and foolish.” It remains current to the present day.
See also: and, forget, forgive
References in periodicals archive ?
For the first time in human history, remembering is the default-simple, easy and seemingly free-and forgetting is hard.
Forgetting is not a breakdown of the memory system.
In this model of forgetting, when we extract a detail from the brain's long-term storage, that detail becomes easier to recall in the future.
Next, we assessed directed forgetting cost by investigating the differences on List 1 between participants who were instructed to forget it (i.e., the forget participants) and those who were instructed to remember it (i.e., the remember participants).
Some outcomes like productivity enhancement can be a result of adopting the optimum leadership approaches like transformational leading and organizational forgetting. Nowadays productivity is one of the most important issues among managers worldwide, and in many countries the national development program is based on productivity improvement(s) [2].
This kind of forgetting as preservation is most clearly evidenced in fragment 194, a text that reveals the poet's endeavor to maintain a connection with his poetic (inked) voice:
Less explicitly about forgetting than most of the other contributions, Williams's essay deals with the effects on the body and mind of an excess of knowledge and fictions.
According to Sullivan, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Webster 'turn to forgetting (as well as its cousins, lethargy and sleep) to construe differently relations between the subject and his social world' (6).
Franklin was once such a runaway, and he may have been willing to mention his humble social origins in his famous autobiography, but his entire life and almost the entire autobiography seemed devoted to forgetting his connection to runaway unfree labor.
Ricoeur's text divides into three parts corresponding to its title: the phenomenology of memory; the epistemology of history; and the hermeneutics of the human historical condition, its "emblem of vulnerability" being "forgetting" (pp.
/ Rilke says, "Even / forgetting / Has a shape in the permanent realm of mutation." / Even, I wonder, the forgetting of memory having forgotten?
If, as the book seems to suggest, knowledge is in some way impossible, if knowledge is incapable of conferring certainty upon Oedipa, as she goes about her search for the origin and dimension of the Tristero conspiracy, then is not forgetting somehow an integral part of The Crying of Lot 49?
It comprises four dense meditations on time as forgetting and remembering, as both gain and loss: "The Immemorial and Recollection," "The Reserve of Forgetting," "The Unforgettable," and "The Sudden and the Un-hoped For," preceded by a new preface and followed by a review ("Retrospection") of C.'s other works.
Year-round schooling, researchers say, enables students to enjoy vacation time without forgetting information.