forget oneself

forget oneself

to forget one's manners or training. (Said in formal situations in reference to belching, bad table manners, and, in the case of very young children, pants-wetting.) Sorry, Mother, I forgot myself. John, we are going out to dinner tonight. Please don't forget yourself.
See also: forget

forget oneself

Lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint; do or say something out of keeping with one's position or character. For example, A teacher should never forget herself and shout at the class. Shakespeare used it in Richard II (3:2): "I had forgot myself: am I not king?" [Late 1500s]
See also: forget
References in classic literature ?
That answer is: one must live in the needs of the day--that is, forget oneself. To forget himself in sleep was impossible now, at least till nighttime; he could not go back now to the music sung by the decanter-women; so he must forget himself in the dream of daily life.
"Love for our neighbor being made of creative attention is analogous to genius." To forget oneself briefly to the point of fully recognizing him or her is to defy necessity.
I think it is quite easy to completely forget oneself and get dragged into the lives of the people we're meeting and their problems, but instead I've been able to extract myself and step away." It's easy to understand how she might find herself becoming over-involved with the people she meets for The Fixer, which sees her tour the country meeting family businesses struggling to stay afloat.
To betray it would be to forget oneself and to display an intolerable lack of integrity:
A garden should be restful and gentle, a place to forget oneself ( rather than a place to be constantly confronted by something dramatic or where one always worries about what friends or neighbours think.
Addressing the youth, the Archbishop pointed out that in a politically correct society, "It is much more sophisticated and daring to uphold, to be faithful, to forget oneself and one's comfort, to be chaste, to be honest even in an inflated economic bubble, to be fair, in short, to be good."