forget


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

an elephant never forgets

One remembers everything. A play on the idea that elephants have great memories. I don't think we can pick up where we were before you betrayed me because an elephant never forgets! I would be hesitant to cross him—he's a dangerous man, and an elephant never forgets.
See also: elephant, forget, never

forget about (someone or something)

1. To not think about, fail to remember, or disregard someone or something. Don't forget about us after you've become a big shot out in LA! This traffic jam is awful! I forgot about the work they were doing to the road. Forget about snowshoes, you'd need a snowmobile to get up to that part of the mountain.
2. To not expect someone or something to work, happen, or do something. The roads are so narrow in this neighborhood—forget about driving your big truck in here! Forget about Sarah, she couldn't lead the team if her life depended on it.
See also: forget

forget (about) it

1. To not expect something to work or happen. Often used as an imperative. If it's a pay raise you're looking for, you can just forget about it. Forget it, there's no way we could get up there without better equipment.
2. Nevermind; I am not going to explain further. Forget about it. I don't want to talk about it. You know what, just forget it. I'm sorry I ever mentioned it.
3. Don't mention it; it was nothing. A response to someone thanking one. A: "Thank you again for your help yesterday." B: "Forget it, I was happy to lend a hand."
4. Don't worry about it; don't consider it a problem. You're still thinking about that? I told you I'm over it. Forget about it.
5. An expression used to indicate that what has just been mentioned is superlative or extreme, and perhaps cannot be put into words. Their wedding ceremony was already a bit weird, but the reception? Forget about it! They were good last year, but with the new draft pick? Forget about it!
See also: forget

forgive and forget

To forgive someone and (attempt to) forget that the wrong they committed ever happened. I really do want to move on, but I just can't forgive and forget that you tried to steal my boyfriend!
See also: and, forget, forgive

not forgetting (someone or something)

Including; as well as; last but not least. And finally, not forgetting our stalwart IT department—there's no way we would have been so successful this year without their incredible work. So in the morning, you'll need to open the blinds, water the plants, and feed the dog. Oh, and not forgetting the heating system, which you'll need to turn off the night before.
See also: forget, not

forget (oneself)

To behave in an impolite or unrestrained manner. Sure, sometimes I forget myself and snap at the kids, but doesn't every mother?
See also: forget

remember to write

A clichéd farewell urging someone to remain in contact while they are gone. Sometimes used humorously as a casual farewell. Have a wonderful time in Paris, Colin! Remember to write! A: "I'd better get going, thanks for having me!" B: "No problem. Remember to write!"
See also: remember, write

don't forget to write

A clichéd farewell urging someone to remain in contact while they are gone. Sometimes used humorously as a casual farewell. Have a wonderful time in Paris, Colin! Don't forget to write! A: "I'd better get going, thanks for having me!" B: "No problem. Don't forget to write!"
See also: forget, write

forget (one's) manners

To act in a rude, impolite, or otherwise inappropriate way. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to reach across the table like that—I must have forgotten my manners for a minute there. How could you say something like that to me? Have you forgotten your manners?
See also: forget, manner

forget you

slang A forceful expression of anger, dismissal, or contempt directed at someone. Can be used as a euphemism for "fuck you," meaning the same. I'm not cleaning up your mess! Forget you! A: "Did you actually think your singing sounded good there?" B: "Oh, forget you." I have every right to be here, so forget you!
See also: forget

Forget (about) it!

 
1. Inf. Drop the subject!; Never mind!; Don't bother me with it. Jane: Then, there's this matter of the unpaid bills. Bill: Forget it! You'll have to pay them all! Sally: What's this I hear about you and Tom? Sue: Forget about it! I don't want to talk to you about it.
2. Inf. Nothing. Sue: What did you say? Mary: Forget it! Tom: Now I'm ready to go. Sue: Excuse me? Tom: Oh, nothing. Just forget it.
3. Inf. You're welcome.; It was nothing. John: Thank you so much for helping me! Bill: Oh, forget it!' Bob: We're all very grateful to you for coming into work today on your day off. Mary: Forget about it! No problem!
See also: forget

forget about someone or something

 
1. to put someone or something out of one's mind. Don't forget about me! You ought to forget about all that.
2. to fail to remember something at the appropriate time. She forgot about paying the electric bill until the lights were turned off. She forgot about the children and they were left standing on the corner.
See also: forget

forget one's manners

to do something ill-mannered. Jimmy! Have we forgotten our manners?
See also: forget, manner

forget oneself

to forget one's manners or training. (Said in formal situations in reference to belching, bad table manners, and, in the case of very young children, pants-wetting.) Sorry, Mother, I forgot myself. John, we are going out to dinner tonight. Please don't forget yourself.
See also: forget

Forget you!

Sl. Drop dead!; Beat it! Oh, yeah! Forget you! Forget you! Get a life!
See also: forget

Forgive and forget.

Prov. You should not only forgive people for hurting you, you should also forget that they ever hurt you. When my sister lost my favorite book, I was angry at her for weeks, but my mother finally convinced me to forgive and forget. Jane: Are you going to invite Sam to your party? Sue: No way. Last year he laughed at my new skirt. Jane: Come on, Sue, forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

Remember to write,

 and Don't forget to write. 
1. Lit. a final parting comment made to remind someone going on a journey to write to those remaining at home. Alice: Bye. Mary: Good-bye, Alice. Remember to write. Alice: I will. Bye. Sally: Remember to write! Fred: I will!
2. Fig. a parting comment made to someone in place of a regular good-bye. (Jocular.) John: See you tomorrow. Bye. Jane: See you. Remember to write. John: Okay. See you after lunch. Jane: Yeah. Bye. Remember to write.
See also: remember, write

forget it

Overlook it, it's not important; you're quite mistaken. This colloquial imperative is used in a variety of ways. For example, in Thanks so much for helping-Forget it, it was nothing, it is a substitute for "don't mention it" or you're welcome; in Stop counting the change-forget it! it means "stop doing something unimportant" in You think assembling this swingset was easy-forget it! it means "it was not at all easy"; and in Forget it-you'll never understand this theorem it means that the possibility of your understanding it is hopeless. [c. 1900]
See also: forget

forget oneself

Lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint; do or say something out of keeping with one's position or character. For example, A teacher should never forget herself and shout at the class. Shakespeare used it in Richard II (3:2): "I had forgot myself: am I not king?" [Late 1500s]
See also: forget

forgive and forget

Both pardon and hold no resentment concerning a past event. For example, After Meg and Mary decided to forgive and forget their differences, they became good friends . This phrase dates from the 1300s and was a proverb by the mid-1500s. For a synonym, see let bygones be bygones.
See also: and, forget, forgive

forˈget it

(spoken)
1 used to tell somebody that something is not important and that they should not worry about it: ‘I still owe you for lunch yesterday.’ ‘Forget it — it was my treat!’
2 used to tell somebody that you are not going to repeat what you said: ‘Now, what were you saying about John?’ ‘Forget it, it doesn’t matter.’
3 used to emphasize that you are saying ‘no’ to something: ‘Any chance of you helping out here?’ ‘Forget it, I’ve got too much to do.’
4 used to tell somebody to stop talking about something because they are annoying you: Just forget it, will you?
See also: forget

not forgetting...

(British English) used to include something in the list of things that you have just mentioned: I share the house with Jim, Ian and Sam, not forgetting Spike, the dog.
See also: not

forˌgive and forˈget

decide to forget an argument, an insult, etc: Come on, it’s time to forgive and forget.Many of his victims find it impossible to forgive and forget.
See also: and, forget, forgive

Forget it!

1. exclam. Never mind, it wasn’t important! I had an objection, but just forget it!
2. exclam. Never mind, it was no trouble at all! No trouble at all. Forget it!
See also: forget

Forget you!

exclam. Drop dead!; Beat it! (Possibly euphemistic for Fuck you!) Forget you! Get a life!
See also: forget

forget (oneself)

To lose one's reserve, temper, or self-restraint.

forget it

Overlook it, disregard it. This colloquial imperative, dating from about 1900, is used in several ways. It can mean the same as “don’t mention it” or “you’re welcome,” as in, “‘Thanks for picking me up.’ ‘Forget it, it was no trouble.’” It also can mean “it won’t happen” or “it’s impossible,” as in “Find a parking space near the theater? Forget it!” These same meanings can be conveyed by forget about it, which, however, also may mean not to recall something and is not a cliché.
See also: forget

forgive and forget

Both pardon and dismiss someone’s mistake, rudeness, or other transgression. This expression has been an English proverb since at least the thirteenth century. William Langland in Piers Ploughman held it up as a form of Christian charity to be practiced by all: “So will Cryst of his curteisye, and men crye hym mercy, bothe forgive and forgeter.” It appears in John Heywood’s 1546 collection of proverbs and was used by Shakespeare in at least four of his plays, including King Lear (4.7): “Pray you now, forget and forgive; I am old and foolish.” It remains current to the present day.
See also: and, forget, forgive
References in periodicals archive ?
People can't help asking these questions, much like they can't consciously forget (or at least not in most cases).
Recent findings published in the Journal of Neuroscience suggest that choosing to forget uses more brain power than trying to remember.
It isn't to forget the danger but because every Filipino man thinks he can sing and will do it at every and any opportunity.
Their findings not only confirmed that humans have the ability to control what they forget, but that successful intentional forgetting required 'moderate levels' of brain activity in these sensory and perceptual areas- more activity than what was required to remember.
Using neuroimaging to track patterns of brain activity, the researchers showed a group of healthy adults images of scenes and faces, instructing them to either remember or forget each image.
In fact, we forget most of the everyday unpleasantness in our daily lives.
"Memories make life so special for each of us; the simple act of remembering your loved one with a Forget Me Not is a wonderful tribute to their memory, and your donation to St Luke's will enable us to support many other people this summer.
A year ago Forget Me Not also took on Grace's Place, a new children's hospice in Bury, to bring the same outstanding care to the hundreds of children waiting for support across North Manchester.
Forget that the dengue vaccine was then not even listed in the National Formulary of drugs that the government may purchase.
we might forget. I call this ignorance, but writing is an ignorance.
When people force themselves to forget a recently seen image, select brain activity is higher than when they try to remember that image.
We don't expect God to command us to forget! Especially in the middle of a rehearsal of all God has done for us in the past.
By broken railing of regret I stand alone in silent pain Praying passing time will forget.
Bankers Life said its annual Forget Me Not Days nationwide fundraiser has raised 350,000 for the Alzheimer's Association.