Forewarn

(redirected from forewarns)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

forewarned is forearmed

One can be appropriately prepared if one knows something in advance. Hey, just so you know, the boss is in a really foul mood today. Forewarned is forearmed, right?
See also: forewarn

forewarn (someone) about (something)

To inform someone of something in advance. Thanks for forewarning me about the boss's foul mood today—I made sure to steer clear of him.
See also: forewarn

forewarn (someone) of (something)

To inform someone of something in advance. Thanks for forewarning me of the boss's foul mood today—I made sure to steer clear of him.
See also: forewarn, of

forewarn someone about something

 and forewarn someone of something
to warn someone about someone or something. They forewarned us of your strange behavior. Didn't we forewarn you about Max's problem?
See also: forewarn

Forewarned is forearmed.

Prov. If you know about something beforehand, you can prepare for it. Before you meet Lily, I should tell you that she's a little eccentric. Forewarned is forearmed, right? Check the temperature before you go outside. Forewarned is forearmed.
See also: Forewarn

forewarned is forearmed

Knowledge in advance enables one to be prepared, as in Let me know when he's in town so I can take the phone off the hook-forewarned is forearmed. This expression originated as a Latin proverb, Praemonitus, praemunitus, which was translated into English by the early 1500s. It soon was put to broader use than its original military applications.
See also: forewarn

forewarned is forearmed

People say forewarned is forearmed to mean that if you know about something which is going to happen in the future, you can be ready to deal with it. Find out what side-effects you will have to expect from the treatment, because forewarned is forearmed. Forewarned is forearmed. Even the most enthusiastic guidebooks admit that the food on the train is awful.
See also: forewarn

foreˌwarned is foreˈarmed

(saying) if you know about problems, dangers, etc. before they happen, you can be better prepared for them: Jim says that Betty is very angry with me still. Well, forewarned is forearmed, and I’ll have to think up an excuse before I see her.
Fore- in these words means ‘before something happens’ or ‘in advance’.
See also: forewarn

forewarned is forearmed

Advance knowledge enables advance preparation. The term originated as a Latin proverb, Praemonitus, praemunitus, which was adopted into English by the early sixteenth century. Two sources from ca. 1530 put it similarly: “He that is warned is half armed.” Shakespeare used a version in Henry VI, Part 3 (4.1): “I will arm me, being thus forewarn’d.” It was soon extended to nonmilitary applications, such as a hostess preparing for expected guests.
See also: forewarn
References in classic literature ?
If you are forewarned you will be the more ready to make allowances."
I kept abreast of Woola that we might have the benefit of all our eyes for what might appear suddenly ahead to menace us, and well it was that we were forewarned.
At last a faint glow ahead forewarned us of the end of the tunnel, for which I for one was devoutly thankful.
He added that Israeli aggressions against the holy Al-Aqsa Mosque have not stopped, the last of which was the opening of the doors of the holy Al-Aqsa Mosque before extremist Jews which necessitates an urgent Arab, Islamic and international move to stop Israel's breaching the freedom of worship in contravention of international law and heavenly religions which forewarns of a religious war which may ignite the entire region for which the Israeli occupation authorities should bear responsibility .
1872-75, forewarns, by its very title, that vulgar illusionism is out of the picture.
In the window a citation from II Peter 3:10 forewarns of the fiery end of the world; another citation follows (Isaiah 54:10), affirming God's everlasting love for creation.