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bring (something) to the fore

To emphasize something or make it more noticeable. Be sure to bring this argument to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Discrepancies in the yearly budget report brought questions of corruption to the fore.
See also: bring, fore

come to the fore

To be emphasized or made more noticeable. This argument needs to come to the fore when you rewrite your paper. Questions of corruption came to the fore after the auditors found discrepancies in the yearly budget report.
See also: come, fore

to the fore

At, in, or toward a position of emphasis, prominence, or importance; to the forefront. Discrepancies in the yearly budget report brought questions of corruption to the fore. The tennis legend came to the fore when she was just 15 years old.
See also: fore

fore and aft

1. At the front and back of something. This phrase is nautical in origin, referring to the bow (located at the front) and the stern (located at the back) of a ship. We need to change the locks fore and aft, I'm afraid.
2. Everywhere; all over. There are people fore and aft—I'll never be able to find you!
See also: aft, and, fore

bring something to the fore

to move something forward; to make something more prominent or noticeable. All the talk about costs brought the question of budgets to the fore. The question of budget planning was brought to the fore.
See also: bring, fore

come to the fore

Fig. to become prominent; to become important. The question of salary has now come to the fore. Since his great successes as a prosecutor, he has really come to the fore in city politics.
See also: come, fore

fore and aft

at the front and the back, usually of a boat or ship. They had to attach new lights fore and aft because the old ones were not bright enough to meet the new regulations. The captain ordered a watch stationed fore and aft.
See also: aft, and, fore

fore and aft

Both front and back, everywhere, as in The children clung to the teacher fore and aft. This expression is nautical terminology for the bow, or front, and the stern, or back, of a vessel. Today it is also used more broadly. [First half of 1600s]
See also: aft, and, fore

to the fore

In, into, or toward a position of prominence, as in A new virtuoso pianist has come to the fore. [First half of 1800s]
See also: fore

be/come to the ˈfore

(British English) (American English be at the ˈfore) be or become important and noticed by people; play an important part: She came very much to the fore in the area during the local campaign against the new bypass.
Fore means ‘front’.
See also: come, fore

bring something to the ˈfore

make something become noticed by people: His political opinions have been brought to the fore recently, particularly after his television appearance last week.
See also: bring, fore, something

to the fore

In, into, or toward a position of prominence: A new virtuoso has come to the fore.
See also: fore
References in periodicals archive ?
By summer's end, Fore estimates she'll have shared SUCCESS for Teens with about 100 orphans and foster children in Jamaica, and she hopes to eventually develop her seminars into all-day workshops or weekend retreats that ultimately will help strengthen communities around the globe.
100% of FORE final year students received their placement offers and 100 % of the first year students secured their summer internship.
4 October 2010 - US healthcare software and services provider iMedX said Friday it has acquired US-based medical transcription provider Fore Transcriptions along with its Indian operations for an undisclosed sum.
Our goal is to build upon Fore Recycling's great reputation.
FORE 1 is able to accommodate 300 people and FORE 2 can cater for 475 people.
European scientists were originally attracted to the Eastern Highlands at the time of Australian pacification in response to reports from the colonial authorities of a fatal condition affecting the Fore people.
Diagnosis: A large-sized species of the Palpomyia tibialis group distinguished by the following combination of characters: females with dark brown legs except fore trochanter, basal 1/2 of fore femur, basal 2/3 of mid femur, fore and mid tibiae except extreme tip, yellowish brown; fore femur with four to five, mid femur with two ventral spines; abdomen lacking gland rods.
Fore graduated in 1935 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and earned a master's degree in agricultural engineering from Purdue University in 1937.
Fore, which has two pubs, a post office, a coffee shop and the smallest village green in Ireland, is a 'magical place' says Jane.
Fore says examples of functional foods include products with oat fiber or soy protein (heart healthy) and butter-type spreads that contain benecol (cholesterol reducing).
Hank Fore emerges from a room lit only by dozens of computer screens, assorted desk lamps and back-lit, floor-to-ceiling maps and globes.
With this announcement, FORE is leading the industry with the introduction of a new generation of wiring closet solutions that offer unprecedented value to our customers," said Joe Pajer, vice president, operations for FORE's Network Systems Business Unit.
General Electric Company (GEC) Plc, the UK electronics group, has bought ATM-switch maker Fore Systems Inc for $4.
In a sign of a continuing turnaround, ACT Networks has announced a reseller agreement with Fore Systems, the second major strategic alliance it has made since the company was restructured.
Fore served from November 2007 to January 2009 as the first female administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and as director of U.