force out


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

force out

1. To cause or compel someone or an animal to leave or move away from something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "out." Police officers forced out the onlookers from the room where the crime had been committed. Good luck forcing the dog out—she thinks our bed is hers now.
2. verb To cause someone to no longer participate or be involved in something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "out." A concussion forced their best player out of the playoffs. The newcomer's surprising 3–2 victory forced out the returning champion in the quarterfinals of the tournament.
3. To persuade or pressure someone to resign from a prominent, authoritative position. A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "out." Do you think these accusations are credible or just an attempt to force out the CEO?
4. verb In baseball, to get a runner out at the base they must advance to. (For instance, when a ball is hit, a runner on first base must advance to second base—even if a ground ball has been hit directly to the second baseman, who can then easily step on the base and get the runner out.) A noun or pronoun can be used between "force" and "out." Ugh, they forced out our best base runner at second.
5. noun In baseball, the act of getting a runner out on such a play. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated. I told our second baseman to get the force-out if the ball is hit to him.
See also: force, out

force out

v.
1. To make someone or something leave by use of force or out of necessity: She was forced out of the game by a leg injury. The scandal forced him out of the company. The fire forced the animals out of the forest.
2. To cause a runner in baseball to be called out when that player cannot act in any way to prevent it: The catcher forced him out at the plate. She was forced out at second base.
See also: force, out
References in periodicals archive ?
And since the third out was a result of the batter-runner being retired before reaching first base, it is treated the same as any other inning-ending force out. Waterloo manager Cal Emery protested the call and was ejected.
And since the third out is the result of a force out, no runs can score.
If the defense makes a proper appeal and he is called out, no runs can score on the play because the inning ended in a force out.
If there had been two outs at the start of play, no runs would have scored because the inning would have ended in a force out. With one out, Temple was allowed to score, but Robinson was "forced" to advance on the play and became the second out.
And since no run can score when the inning ends in a force out, Horsford's run was erased.