force of habit


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force of habit

An impulse to do something because one does or has done it habitually. Used to describe an unconscious mistake that results from following one's routine rather than choosing the correct action for the circumstances. After living next door to Anna for 50 years, I call our new neighbor "Anna" by force of habit. A: "Why did you just turn left? We're going to the bank." B: "Force of habit. That's the way I take to work."
See also: force, habit, of

force of ˈhabit

a tendency always to do things in a certain way because you have always done them in that way: I don’t know why I check all the locks every time I leave the house. It’s force of habit, I suppose.
See also: force, habit, of
References in periodicals archive ?
Waleswere saved by a couple of shocking French errors and sheer force of habit as they achieved a great escape in a thrilling 24-19 comeback win in the Six Nations opener at the Stade de France on Friday.
They call it force of habit. However you may want to call it, habits play a very important role in developing your personality and making you, well, uniquely you.
What the police or speed cameras can't do is put your seatbelt on, it should be a force of habit by now but here again, drivers prefer to dice with death as two out of three people who died in road accidents last year were not wearing one.
Of course, there's always the chance the Sky Sports camera trucks will, through sheer force of habit, stop 70 miles short of the Riverside stadium and set up in Leeds.
Connecting to a Wi-Fi spot seems to be a force of habit, as 46 percent of consumers worldwide said they can't wait more than a few minutes before logging into a network, or asking the owner of the hotspot for the password, whether it be a cafe spot or at a friend's house.
Force of Habit has the instrumental makeup of any other jazz ensemble.
The inquest heard that the house in Ystradgynlais, near Swansea, had a downstairs toilet but Jason used the upstairs one due to "force of habit".
Fans will flock to St James' Park genuinely excited about the football on display once again - even though the opposition at the very least will be of a lesser standard - rather than just turn up at the ground every other weekend merely out of a force of habit.
This is the routine cruelty of a security cabal, its humanity withered by years in power: it is genocide by force of habit. ("Counter-Insurgency on the Cheap," London Review of Books, August 15, 2004)
But the doctrine sometimes sounds more like force of habit. A-A?A1/2It has worked for us for decades,A-A?A1/2 Air Force Secretary Deborah James told a congressional committee last month.
Partnered for the first time by William Easterby, he was held up off the pace for the first two circuits before cruising into contention down the back straight and took it up from Force Of Habit at the last.
Is it really overriding worry about identity theft and money-laundering, or is it more the force of habit in an industry that has long shunned poor neighbourhoods and customers?
The hosts, Askham Bryan College, sponsored the Men's Open race, where Force of Habit continued Sarah Dent's good vein of form, the trainer having won the Hurworth's equivalent with Executive's Hall.
Every day, people succumb to denial--including investors, financial advisors and yes, politicians, who occasionally practice denial as a force of habit.