force (someone or something) into (something)

(redirected from force into)

force (someone or something) into (something)

1. To cause something to collapse or break inward using a great deal of force. I couldn't open the box properly, so I just used my thumbs to force the lid into it. Police had to force the door into the suspect's apartment.
2. To push, shove, or jam someone or something into a particular space or thing. That box is full of breakables, so don't just force it into the closet like that! I can't believe they forced us into that dirty jail cell, as if we were a couple of petty criminals!
3. To persuade or pressure someone or an animal to enter some space or thing. Don't force her into the elevator if she's scared I ultimately had to force the dog back into the house because we were running late.
4. To persuade, pressure, or compel someone or something to do something or enter into some arrangement or situation. A noun or pronoun is used between "force" and "into." No one forced him into signing that contract! She was forced into marriage at a very young age. The stock market crash has forced the country into another economic downturn.
See also: force
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This is the moment, as it was then, and was for them, as we transition our Air Force into a very different future.
The challenge lies in training our supervisors to develop this next generation and bring the junior force into the fold with their spirit and motivations intact.
Out of the ashes of defeat in Vietnam, a cadre of officers, including Colin Powell and Anthony Zinni, turned a dispirited draft force into a volunteer body that became the most powerful military the world had ever seen.
So, thank you again for the opportunity to share these thoughts with you about how I see the contribution of an air and space force into this business of interdependence.
A significant transformation effort seeks to transform the joint force into smaller, rapid, more agile forces with greater deployability and lethality than much of the current force.
[General Moseley] and I live that every day as we together lead our Air Force into an ever-better future.
Claude Bolton Jr., assistant secretary of the Army for acquisition, logistics and technology, said the money being spent on changing the current force into a future force is closely managed.
In moving our Air Force into the STOL and STOVL world for CAS, we will look for training efficiencies to be gained by working jointly with the Marine Corps on facility use and course development.
At the strategic level, airmen combine skills and experiences to develop a knowledge base that extends beyond the Air Force into Defense Department, interagency, and international arenas.
That's why we've focused on reorganizing the Air Force into a modularized, expeditionary force; one that is able to rapidly deploy, establish operations, and just as quickly, redeploy forces to new operating locations.
Our objective in this journey is to transform our Air Force into a 21st century total force team, capable of bringing the deterrent and compelling effects of air and space power to bear against asymmetric and traditional threats.
We are working our whole Air Force into the rhythm of the Air Expeditionary Force to include Professional Military Education (PME), creating PME modules to allow greater flexibility instead of tying everyone to a summer to summer cycle, coordinating assignment cycles with our professional education, and force packages that we've taken down from the wingsized force packages of the Cold War into small bite-size force packages that we deploy today.