forage

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forage around for (something)

To hunt around for something; to look through something in search of something else, typically food. I foraged around in the pantry for a snack but still didn't find anything I wanted to eat.
See also: around, for, forage

forage for (something)

To hunt around for something; to look through something in search of something else, typically food. I foraged in the pantry for a snack but still didn't find anything I wanted to eat.
See also: for, forage
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

forage (around) (for something)

to search for something, especially something to eat. I will go to the kitchen and forage around for some cereal or something. The rabbits got into the garden and were foraging for a good meal.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
could potentially make foraged foods unhealthy or even dangerous to
As is the case elsewhere around the globe, humans foraged in what
War, freed slaves earned money by selling foods they foraged and hunted.
During the breeding season, RCWs in Louisiana foraged more frequently on smaller pine stems (< 40 cm dbh) than during the nonbreeding season (Jones and Hunt, 1996).
They foraged on baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) in greater proportion than availability during the nonbreeding season (DeLotelle et al., 1987).
Annually, and for both seasons, RCWs foraged on the trunk above the first limbs and on limbs.
This dissimilarity between habitats is driven by the fact that recurvirostrids rarely used bayshore and lakeshore, and when they did, they either only foraged or exhibited other behaviors (Table 2).
Large charadrids foraged significantly less in summer (P = 0.001, df = 3, F = 8.15).
As previously reported along the Texas coast (Lee, 1995; Brusati et al., 2001), willets, members of the medium scolopacids guild, foraged the majority of time during our study.
Deer mice foraged in the canopy less frequently (58% of all trials) than did harvest mice and white-footed mice (Table 2).
All three species readily foraged in the canopy when forced to do so by the absence of surface seeds, however, canopy foraging varied among species when surface seeds were abundant (Tables 2 and 3).
Deer mice ranked third to harvest mice and white-footed mice in overall use of herbaceous canopy for foraging as they selectively fed on surface seeds when available and only foraged in canopy when surface seeds were absent or limited, or when surface seeds were abundant and seed caches were made.
To test if a bird foraged in association with flooding or ebbing tides, using the 200-s scans by the RRS at the colony, I compared the proportion of time a bird was on a foraging trip during flood and ebb tides to the proportion of time a bird was expected to be on a foraging trip during flood and ebb tides.
A total of 24 of 26 radio-tagged birds foraged in one particular area an average of one or more trips per day ([greater than or equal to] 50% of their foraging trips) during spring tides, neap tides, or both tide series.
The area-faithful birds seldom foraged in RRS areas other than their primary area.