for (someone or something)

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for (someone or something)

Supporting or approving of someone or something. Can you believe he's for building that new shopping center right in the middle of town?
See also: for

for one

As one example or reason (out of several potential ones). Often used after a name or personal pronoun to count someone or oneself as an example of something. Why don't I like musicals? Well, for one, I just can't take a story seriously when it's set to music. I can tell you that I for one am really happy about the changes to the tax law they've introduced. A: "Who is coming to the movie later?" B: "Mary, for one, but I haven't heard back from anyone else."
See also: for, one
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(all) for someone or something

Fig. (completely) in favor of someone or something; supporting someone or something. I'm all for your candidacy. I'm for the incumbent in the upcoming election.

for

(some) days running and for (some) weeks running; for (some) months running; for (some) years running days in a series; months in a series; etc. (The some can be any number.) I had a bad cold for five days running. For two years running, I brought work home from the office every night.

for

(some) years running Go to for (some) days running.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

for one

Also, for one thing. As the first of several possible instances. For example, Everything seemed to go wrong; for one, we had a flat tire, and then we lost the keys, or I find many aspects of your proposal to be inadequate; for one thing, you don't specify where you'll get the money . For one can also be applied to a person, as in He doesn't like their behavior, and I for one agree with him.
See also: for, one
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

for

/in fun
As a joke; playfully.

for

/to all intents and purposes
In every practical sense; practically: To all intents and purposes the case is closed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
Every one was headed for us. The dugouts, which were of unusual length, were manned by twenty paddlers, ten to a side.
The lovely Zoraida was watching for us at a window, and as soon as she perceived that there were people there, she asked in a low voice if we were "Nizarani," as much as to say or ask if we were Christians.
But it was now most essential for us to be on the move, and carefully and quickly we regained the vessel, where those who had remained on board were waiting for us in apprehension of some mishap having befallen us.
At last we reached a large and handsome building of bamboos, and were by signs told to enter it, the natives opening a lane for us through which to pass; on entering without ceremony, we threw our exhausted frames upon the mats that covered the floor.
What had brought us thither must have appeared a complete mystery to them, and from our ignorance of the language it was impossible for us to enlighten them.
As for us, when he was gone we made haste to leave the fatal castle, and, stationing ourselves beside our rafts, we waited to see what would happen.
"He says it will be better for us to go back where we left our things and camp there.
We stayed, however, in this place from the latter end of July to the beginning of September, when having provided ourselves with other vessels, we set out for Cochim, and landed there after a very hazardous and difficult passage, made so partly by the currents and storms which separated us from each other, and partly by continual apprehensions of the English and Dutch, who were cruising for us in the Indian seas.
As for us, who were to go by Zeila, we had still greater difficulties to struggle with: we were entirely strangers to the ways we were to take, to the manners, and even to the names of the nations through which we were to pass.
At the first floor we found that the hallway ran but halfway through, necessitating the crossing of a rear room full of green folk, ere we could reach the inner courtyard, so there was but one thing left for us to do, and that was to gain the second floor and the hallway through which I had traversed the length of the building.
Just before dark they had been close enough for us to plainly distinguish that they were green Martians, and all during the long night we distinctly heard the clanking of their accoutrements behind us.
Then I asked the captain what way he thought best for us to manage a fight with them; for resist them I was resolved we would, and that to the last drop.
This latter part we found to concern us directly, though we knew it to be false; yet, as my partner said, very justly, if we had fallen into their hands, and they had had such a prepossession against us beforehand, it had been in vain for us to have defended ourselves, or to hope for any good quarter at their hands; especially considering that our accusers had been our judges, and that we could have expected nothing from them but what rage would have dictated, and an ungoverned passion have executed.
Lord John held up his hand as a signal for us to stop, and he made his way swiftly, stooping and running, to the line of rocks.
It was water, or a good imitation of it, and that was enough for us. We gave a bound and a rush, and in another second we were all down on our stomachs sucking up the uninviting fluid as though it were nectar fit for the gods.