for (someone or something)

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for (someone or something)

Supporting or approving of someone or something. Can you believe he's for building that new shopping center right in the middle of town?
See also: for

for one

As one example or reason (out of several potential ones). Often used after a name or personal pronoun to count someone or oneself as an example of something. Why don't I like musicals? Well, for one, I just can't take a story seriously when it's set to music. I can tell you that I for one am really happy about the changes to the tax law they've introduced. A: "Who is coming to the movie later?" B: "Mary, for one, but I haven't heard back from anyone else."
See also: for, one
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(all) for someone or something

Fig. (completely) in favor of someone or something; supporting someone or something. I'm all for your candidacy. I'm for the incumbent in the upcoming election.

for

(some) days running and for (some) weeks running; for (some) months running; for (some) years running days in a series; months in a series; etc. (The some can be any number.) I had a bad cold for five days running. For two years running, I brought work home from the office every night.

for

(some) years running Go to for (some) days running.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

for one

Also, for one thing. As the first of several possible instances. For example, Everything seemed to go wrong; for one, we had a flat tire, and then we lost the keys, or I find many aspects of your proposal to be inadequate; for one thing, you don't specify where you'll get the money . For one can also be applied to a person, as in He doesn't like their behavior, and I for one agree with him.
See also: for, one
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

for

/in fun
As a joke; playfully.

for

/to all intents and purposes
In every practical sense; practically: To all intents and purposes the case is closed.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
This would increase to PS165.76 for someone earning PS25,000 a year, while someone earning PS40,000 a year would pay an extra PS315.76 a year.
If that someone cannot and does not know how to do this, it is time for that someone to say this and for us to look for someone that can.
Others may need to make long-term plans if they are caring for someone who has been diagnosed with dementia.
Sec - ond most embarrassing, according to the British Heart Foundation survey, was expressing your love for someone, with men finding it hard to voice their romantic feelings.
By the same token, I wouldn't vote for someone who truly believed in the founding whoppers of Mormonism.
MBA questions, in many ways, are grossly unfair for someone who did not grow up within the same cultural paradigm--for example, in the West we are often encouraged to be individuals, go against the grain, and think outside the box--values that are not necessarily encouraged in Japanese culture.
For instance, we frequently hear how essential it is for someone to think "outside the box," but what actually determines one's facility for doing so?
He had had a big bite of the American dream, and for someone who started out as a farm boy in the boonies, that had been quite an adventure.
He added: "We are looking for someone with a proven record of leadership in local government, someone who recognises both the constraints on towns in the North-east with their problems but also someone with drive and determination to take us where we want to be.
You might be surprised how something as simple as holding an elevator for someone, a cheerful "good morning," or a polite "thank you" can lead to assistance in a time of need.
Wait for someone else to make the first move, and you'll also be waiting to be called, asked out and kissed.
My solution: I will probably look for someone else to do the task in the future, especially if it involves something important.
"This is a great chance for someone with a strong vision to come along and create something really special for themselves, while acquiring a bit of history," said Mr.
It was a little surprising for someone who represented a substantial [Orthodox Jewish] community, but he was very forward-thinking, and I think he related to all civil rights struggles."
* Look for someone who is feeling left out and lend a helping hand.
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