for show

for show

Done merely for the sake of appearance; not genuine or sincere. Edward always carries a lot of highly literary books around with him, but it's all for show so he can appear smarter to other people. The items in the window are just for show, so I'm afraid I can't sell them to you.
See also: show

for show

For the sake of appearances or display. For example, They put on a lavish buffet, mainly for show, or The police pretended to jail the informer, for show. [c. 1700]
See also: show

do something/be for ˈshow

do something/be done to attract attention or admiration, and for no other purpose: That expensive computer is just for show; he doesn’t really know how to use it.
See also: show, something
References in classic literature ?
The aged rakishness of his appearance was set off by a youthful costume; he had disreputable grey hair and a disreputable sore, red nose; but the coat and the gesture, the outworks of the man, were still designed for show.
Nutrition and exercise are also extremely important for show dogs.
Twice a year, the International Black Buyers and Manufacturers Expo and Conference brings 1,000 small businesses together for show and sell in Washington, D.
A list of disease-prevention guidelines for shows is available at www.
The Hudson River piers are rolling out a red carpet for shows, but in New York City, cache doesn't come from the Hudson unless you are in a tower and bragging about sunset views.