for show

for show

Done merely for the sake of appearance; not genuine or sincere. Edward always carries a lot of highly literary books around with him, but it's all for show so he can appear smarter to other people. The items in the window are just for show, so I'm afraid I can't sell them to you.
See also: show

for show

For the sake of appearances or display. For example, They put on a lavish buffet, mainly for show, or The police pretended to jail the informer, for show. [c. 1700]
See also: show

do something/be for ˈshow

do something/be done to attract attention or admiration, and for no other purpose: That expensive computer is just for show; he doesn’t really know how to use it.
See also: show, something
References in periodicals archive ?
Along the way, the show has tackled issues including gay students' rights, sexual harassment, and "reparative therapy." Says Lipman, "We never set down a bible for show. We had general ideas about the characters, but we've gone where the characters have led us.
Nutrition and exercise are also extremely important for show dogs.
Twice a year, the International Black Buyers and Manufacturers Expo and Conference brings 1,000 small businesses together for show and sell in Washington, D.C.
Not surprisingly, for shows that are focused on sex, the idea of nymphomania is a favorite topic of discussion.
For shows running outside of New York, cast size varies based on the size of the stage.
A list of disease-prevention guidelines for shows is available at www.aphis.usda.gov/ oa/fmd/disease.html.
The Hudson River piers are rolling out a red carpet for shows, but in New York City, cache doesn't come from the Hudson unless you are in a tower and bragging about sunset views.